Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Posts Tagged ‘story’

January 10, 2009

New stories: Brown pelicans turning up sick

The Contra Costa Times video perfectly captured the sounds, words and deeds of our staff and volunteers working with impacted brown pelicans. This report is from Fairfield and similar stories could be told from the Southern California bird center:

The voice over is from Michelle Bellizzi, our dedicated Rehabilitation Manager in Fairfield, CA.

Read the complete story from the January 9th Contra Costa Times

See the IBRRC report on pelican crisis

January 6, 2009

What’s causing fatigued pelicans to drop from sky?

The ongoing discovery of scores of fatigued and disoriented California Brown Pelicans is causing concern among biologists and bird lovers, but yielding few concrete answers to what’s causing their condition.

Since late in December, the giant seabirds have been found in frail condition along highways and backyards, miles from their coastal homes. At both IBRRC bird centers, but especially at the San Pedro center, we’ve had our hands full treating these remarkable birds. There are almost 50 pelicans in care this week alone.

Writer Louis Sahagun and photographer Mark Boster of the Los Angeles Times collaborated to capture the concern for these pelicans:

Wildlife rescuers from San Diego to San Francisco suddenly are facing a distressing biological mystery: Disoriented and bruised California brown pelicans are landing on highways and airport runways and in farm fields, alleys and backyards miles from their normal coastal haunts.

In the last week, the big brown birds known for flying in formation over beaches have been reported wobbling across Culver Boulevard in Playa del Rey and on a Los Angeles International Airport runway. Two dead pelicans were found on the 110 Freeway. Elsewhere, one smacked into a car.

See: California brown pelicans found frail and far from home

View: The LA Times photo gallery

Learn how you can help us care for these birds: Adopt-a-Pelican

January 23, 2008

Frigatebird treated at IBRRC makes the news

Nice article by Peter Fimrite on the front page of today’s San Francisco Chronicle about the Frigatebird found in Healdsburg and now being treated at IBRRC in Cordelia:

“A giant tropical bird – a type rarely, if ever, seen in the Bay Area – got stuck in the vortex of a hurricane-force Pacific storm this month and took a dizzying Wizard of Oz-like ride hundreds, maybe thousands, of miles off course.

That’s the theory of how it ended up in a tree in Healdsburg.

The gangly, feathered galoot with a hooked beak and wingspan topping 7 feet is recovering at a Bay Area animal rescue center after a couple of bird watchers spotted it in the tree and knew right away that it was alien to Northern California.

It was positively identified Tuesday as a male juvenile magnificent frigatebird, known scientifically as Fregata magnificens. The species is known to inhabit the tropical Atlantic, the Caribbean and Cape Verde Islands. Although frigatebirds breed along the Pacific coast as far north as Mexico, they are most at home in steaming hot equatorial regions like the Galapagos Islands.

“In our entire 37 years, we’ve never treated one in Northern California,” said Monte Merrick, a wildlife rehabilitator for the International Bird Rescue Research Center, in Cordelia. “There have been sightings, but those sightings are rare.”

Read the complete story

See the video report

IBRRC’s website page on the Magnificent Frigatebird

November 27, 2007

More than 20,000 birds died?

From the San Francisco Chronicle:

…Bird experts figure that for every bird found dead or alive, about five to 10 others go unreported because they sink at sea, get eaten by predators or fly elsewhere. That would put the fatality number at up to 21,500 birds.

Read more from the Nov. 27, 2007 article

November 15, 2007

Oiled birds everywhere in SF Bay

Read Jane Kay’s excellent article in today’s San Francisco Chronicle

Nearly 1.6 million shorebirds and waterfowl come to San Francisco Bay each year, most staying for the winter, some stopping on their way south. Wildlife experts fear that oil washing onto sandy beaches and wetlands threatens bird’s survival. See map

What worries experts most is that migrating birds are stopping in the spill soaked bay as they head south for the winter along the Pacific Flyway. Even a quick stop over may kill the birds as they leave with feathers contaminated by the oil.

So far, about 1,500 birds have been picked up dead or alive, including Scaups, Scoters, Grebes, Loons, Cormorants and even Marbled Murrelets and Snowy Plovers. See update on www.ibrrc.org

Wildlife rescue crews are still finding oiled birds in every nook and cranny of the bay. See: Search for birds goes on