Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Posts Tagged ‘rescued’

February 13, 2009

Great little movie of Brown Pelican rescue

People send us the nicest things:

“I am a local (Venice based) film director. The other day I was shooting on the beach and I got some great footage of a sick pelican and his subsequent rescue by one of your volunteers.

I edited together a little one minute film I thought might be useful for you and your cause.”

Tao Ruspoli in Southern California took this video and sent it to us after seeing a [adult, winter plumage] pelican in distress. A member of the Marine Wildlife Rescue team scoops up the bird and takes it to IBRRC’s San Pedro bird center for treatment.

Thanks Tao for creating this great Public Service announcement (PSA).

October 13, 2008

Video report on release of 373 penguins in Brazil

If you never witnessed the remarkable and heartwarming release of rehabilitated penguins, check out this video from CNN:


The Magellanic Penguins were flown on a Brazilian military C-130 Hercules transport plane. In all, 373 young penguins were rescued, rehabilitated and released last weekend after their search for food left them stranded, hundreds of miles from their usual feeding grounds.

Animal-welfare activists loaded the birds onto a Brazilian air force cargo plane and flew them 1,550 miles to the country’s southern coast, where a crowd of onlookers celebrated as the penguins marched back into the sea.

“We are overjoyed to see these penguins waddle back to the ocean and have a second chance at life,” said veterinarian Dr. Valeria Ruoppolo of the International Fund for Animal Welfare, the group that oversaw the rescue.

An IFAW ER Team, along with colleagues from Center for the Recovery of Marine Animals (CRAM), Institute for Aquatic Mammals (IMA) and the environmental authority in Brazil, IBAMA, released the penguins in early October, making history as the largest group of these penguins to ever be released in Brazil at one time. All of the birds were banded with Federal bands and the Federal Banding authority, CEMAVE, came to work with the ER Team and others to learn about banding penguins.

This effort is part of The Penguin Network which partner in South America with local organizations and is co-managed by IBRRC and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

Read the full story on CNN.Com

November 17, 2007

A call for volunteers: A personal account


In wake of oil spill, bird rescuers work against clock, the odds:

“…A group of net-wielding bird rescuers in white Tyvek coveralls converged on the scoters from two sides. As the lead netter yelled, “Go, go, go, go, go!” they charged. The ducks, unaware that they were being rescued, fled for the water. Three got away; three were netted and transferred to towel-lined cardboard pet carriers. Then someone asked if we could take the scoters to the International Bird Rescue Research Center in Cordelia in Solano County for cleaning. Sure!…”

– Excerpt from San Francisco Chronicle’s “Diary of a Dirty Job” column by avid birders and extraordinary volunteers Joe Eaton and Ron Sullivan.

Read the full column

November 15, 2007

Still out searching for birds

A week has past since the foul stench of bunker crude left its mark on San Francisco Bay. The oil is being cleaned off beaches and the bay. And more importantly from a wildlife standpoint, birds are STILL being rescued.

Crews are working at this very moment trying to locate and catch any oiled bird in distress. They’re searching the rocky shores of Treasure Island, the muddy flats at low tide in Berkeley, the estuaries of Alameda and the Hoffman Marsh area in Richmond that may contain beached oiled birds. They use cat-like tactics, scouting out locations for night time pickups using beacons of light to sneak up on oiled, hyperthermic birds.

It’s not easy work. The birds are spooked easily and wary of anyone carrying a net. But this is the front lines of wildlife rescue and these dedicated crews from IBRRC/OWCN, Fish & Game and others are doing everything in their power to pickup every distressed bird possible.

Please, if you see a birds that need to be rescued, call 311 in San Francisco; outside the SF, please call (415) 701-2311 or if you can’t get through, submit an online sighting report.

Be patient. The crews have a lot of ground to cover. Some areas may be cordoned off in advance to calm skitish birds, allowing crews to capture the unaware avian victims.

Above all, keep unleashed dogs away from beaches and shorelines containing birds. Without your help, good will and continued public bird sightings, the search will surely drag on.

Check our website for more updates: http://www.ibrrc.org

November 14, 2007

Drop off donated items at Enterprise Rent-A-Car

The good folks at Enterprise Rent-A-Car have graciously offered to except donations for the oiled bird rescue at four distinct locations in the Bay Area.

If you paper towels, toilet paper, Pedialyte, Ensure or other items to donate, please drop them off at the following locations between 8 AM – 5 PM, Monday through Friday.

In the North Bay:

Enterprise Rent-A-Car
600 Rush Landing Road
Novato, CA 94945
Map

East Bay
Enterprise Rent-A-Car
1706 San Pablo Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94702
Map

San Francisco
Enterprise Rent-A-Car
312 8th Street (at Folsom)
San Francisco, CA 94103
Map

San Jose
Enterprise Rent-A-Car
3635 Pearl Avenue
San Jose, CA 95136.
Map

November 9, 2007

Dark day on San Francisco Bay

The staff here at International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC) has been working non-stop for the three days rescuing as many oiled birds as possible. So far, the center in Cordelia has more than 70 birds in care.

Check out the disturbing photos on SF Chronicle’s website

The culprit of this spill is the Cosco Busan. It’s a container ship that struck the San Francisco Bay Bridge on Wednesday, November 7, 2007 causing 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel oil to dump into the bay. It was heading out to sea when the accident happened.

IBRRC was quickly alerted by mid day on Wednesday to the potential of oiled animals. As a major partner in the Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN), we had staff members on the water and shoreline surveying the damage to wildlife.

As spill is coating birds and other wildlife. Unless these birds are rescued soon, the oil spill potentially will endanger the lives of thousands of birds that live in and migrate through these coastal waters.

Check our website is http://www.ibrrc.org