Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Posts Tagged ‘public’

November 19, 2010

Public’s help still needed to locate injured gulls

The public is being urged by rescuers to keep an eye out for the remaining beer-can-collared gulls in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Recent sightings of the adult and juvenile Western gulls have come in from Bolinas Lagoon to San Francisco’s Fishermen’s Wharf to SF State University out near Lake Merced. The bird (top, right) is a second year juvenile Western Gull photographed on November 17th at San Francisco State University in the southwestern area of the city.

Like most wild birds, they are understandably wary of approach. If you see one of these birds please send or call in details – Time, Date, location, and a pic if possible – phoning (831) 429-2323 and/or emailing rescue@wildrescue.org. Two organizations are collaborating on this effort, International Bird Rescue (Fairfield) and WildRescue (Monterey).

The reward has been raised to $6,100 for the arrest and conviction of the person(s) who collared the gulls.

Earlier this week a team from WildRescue successfully captured one gull at Lake Merced and removed the beer can from it’s neck. Video of the gull rescue is on YouTube

See more information here: http://wildrescues.blogspot.com/

November 10, 2007

Sea of good will

From all over California the offers to help keep rolling in:

“If this is as big as they say, every person in the Bay Area that wants to help, should be used to help. Please give the Bay Area community the opportunity & instructions to help resolve this disaster in our own backyard. I have 2 good hands, 2 good feet & 2 days off work. Please don’t let that go to waste…” – J.C.


“If there is anything I can do to help with this horrendous tragedy, please contact me, thank you.” – L.B.

“I live in Santa Barbara and I am willing to travel to the Bay Area to volunteer, or to bring supplies from San Pedro to San Francisco.” – E.C.

“I’m available this week and maybe longer to help with the current oil spill. I understand that you might not be ready to accept volunteers. If so, just ignore this message. I’ll keep on checking the website. Thanks for your work.” – C.C.

“…Please find a use for me!” – T.O.

“I have no training, but am willing to learn, I am 55 years old with free time, thank you.” – G.H.

“Hello, I read through your web site and realized they are not many opportunities to help without training. However if there are any ways I can help with my time, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I take directions well and am a true nature and animal lover. I’d rather do something than feel powerless…” – C.P.

Note: I gathered some of these comments from hundreds of volunteer application submissions off IBRRC’s website. We’ve forwarded all these offers of help to the state’s volunteer coordinator. The OWCN site gives more updated info.

Please know, your good words and deeds will somehow be utilized. Thank you!