Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Posts Tagged ‘beer cans’

December 11, 2010

Success! Another beer can collared gull rescued

A rescue team from WildRescue and IBRRC captured another beer can collared gull today in San Francisco. The gull had the can removed from its neck and was released.

This is the third bird captured with a cut beer can secured to its neck. This gull was captured at San Francisco State University. The can was removed and the bird had only minor feather damage to its neck. The gull was released quickly back to the wild.

There have been multiple sightings of birds flying around with these neck collars. A $6,500 reward for information leading to an arrest has been in place since November. One bird was rescued last month at Lake Merced and another in Half Moon Bay.

“This is a federal crime punishable by severe fines, imprisonment, or both,” says Rebecca Dmytryk, with WildRescue, the group spearheading this effort. The US Fish & Wildlife Services, who administrate the Migratory Bird Treaty Act under which this act is punishable, has been alerted to these incidents.

WildRescue asks that instead of attempting to capture the birds, which can make them more wary and harder to catch, sightings should be reported immediately by calling (831) 429-2323 or emailing rescue@wildrescue.org.

Media report:

Gull freed of beer-can collar – more need help: San Francisco Chronicle

November 19, 2010

Public’s help still needed to locate injured gulls

The public is being urged by rescuers to keep an eye out for the remaining beer-can-collared gulls in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Recent sightings of the adult and juvenile Western gulls have come in from Bolinas Lagoon to San Francisco’s Fishermen’s Wharf to SF State University out near Lake Merced. The bird (top, right) is a second year juvenile Western Gull photographed on November 17th at San Francisco State University in the southwestern area of the city.

Like most wild birds, they are understandably wary of approach. If you see one of these birds please send or call in details – Time, Date, location, and a pic if possible – phoning (831) 429-2323 and/or emailing rescue@wildrescue.org. Two organizations are collaborating on this effort, International Bird Rescue (Fairfield) and WildRescue (Monterey).

The reward has been raised to $6,100 for the arrest and conviction of the person(s) who collared the gulls.

Earlier this week a team from WildRescue successfully captured one gull at Lake Merced and removed the beer can from it’s neck. Video of the gull rescue is on YouTube

See more information here: http://wildrescues.blogspot.com/

November 17, 2010

Reward raised to $6,100 for info on collared gulls

As the search continues for other beer can collared birds in the San Francisco Bay Area, the reward has been raised to $6,100 for the arrest and conviction of the person(s) who collared the gulls.

Thanks to a generous $5,000 pledge from the California Beer and Beverage Distributors (CBBD), the reward will help to focus more attention in stopping the prankster (s) from collaring anymore birds. The CBBD is a nonprofit representing 100 beer distributors and brewer/vendor members in California.

Earlier this week one of the gulls was captured by a team from WildRescue and the beer can removed from its neck. It was caught at Lake Merced in San Francisco. See video below

November 16, 2010

One beer can collared gull finally rescued!

This week rescuers captured a beer can collared gull in San Francisco. The WildRescue team caught the bird at Lake Merced out near the San Francisco Zoo and removed the aluminum beer can from the bird’s neck.

Experts believe that someone is maliciously catching gulls (seagulls) and collaring them with cut beer cans. Thanks to reports by members of the public and birders, sightings have come in from San Francisco (Pier 39 and another juvenile gull at Lake Merced), Half Moon Bay and various locations around the Bay Area.

The two organizations collaborating on this effort, International Bird Rescue (Fairfield) and WildRescue (Monterey), are seeking the public’s help is locating other birds. They ask that instead off attempting to capture the birds, which can make them more wary and harder to catch, sightings should be reported immediately by calling (831) 429-2323 or emailing rescue@wildrescue.org.

“This is a federal crime punishable by severe fines, imprisonment, or both,” says Rebecca Dmytryk, with WildRescue, one of the groups spearheading this effort. The US Fish & Wildlife Services, who administrate the Migratory Bird Treaty Act under which this act is punishable, has been alerted to these incidents.

Birds were first spotted by the public in August around San Francisco.

November 4, 2010

Who’s collaring Bay Area gulls with beer cans?

It has been confirmed by wildlife experts that someone is maliciously catching gulls (seagulls) and collaring them with cut beer cans. Thanks to reports by members of the public and birders, sightings have come in from San Francisco (Pier 39 and another juvenile gull at Lake Merced), Half Moon Bay and various locations around the Bay Area.

The two organizations collaborating on this effort, International Bird Rescue (Fairfield) and WildRescue (Monterey), are seeking the public’s help is locating the birds. They ask that instead off attempting to capture the birds, which can make them more wary and harder to catch, sightings should be reported immediately by calling (831) 429-2323 or emailing rescue@wildrescue.org.

“This is a federal crime punishable by severe fines, imprisonment, or both,” says Rebecca Dmytryk, with WildRescue, one of the groups spearheading this effort. The US Fish & Wildlife Services, who administrate the Migratory Bird Treaty Act under which this act is punishable, has been alerted to these incidents.

Through an anonymous donor, a $1,000.00 reward being is being offered for the arrest and prosecution of the person or persons committing these crimes. Anyone interested in adding to the reward should contact either organization.

Both organizations are recruiting members for their search and rescue efforts. Anyone interested in receiving training and volunteering as a rescuer should contact them through their websites: www.ibrrc.org or www.wildrescue.org

Media report

Bay Area birds found with jagged beer cans around their necks: MercuryNews.com

(Top photo courtesy of Don Battle)