Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Posts Tagged ‘appeal’

December 29, 2010

A Recipe For Bird Rescue

Dear Friends,

What does it take to rescue a sick or injured bird?

Every year, IBRRC cares for more than 5,000 stricken aquatic birds at our two California rescue centers.

We are currently caring for dozens of birds oiled by natural seep of oil along our coast, birds impacted by the massive storms that are moving through California and birds with gun shot injuries and fishing line entanglements. We also receive many species of waterfowl like a tundra swan (right photo) that was found cold and weak in a farmer’s field.

These birds’ lives depend on the kindness of strangers — people like you.

Will you make a contribution to help them? Through December 31, friends of IBRRC will match all donations, dollar for dollar, up to $15,000. That means your support will go twice as far to help birds.

Our centers are the last line of defense for sick and injured birds. If we didn’t exist, there would be nowhere else for them to go.

As a result, at any given time we often have hundreds of birds in our care. And we depend heavily on our wonderful volunteers to help a small paid staff keep our clinics open 365 days a year.

IBRRC’s recipe for rescue:
1. Capture or admit the stricken bird
2. Perform triage
3. Provide treatment and medication
4. Feed and house in a safe environment
5. Observe, monitor and evaluate for release
6. Release back into the wild

Ingredients: Medicine, Water, sheets, towels, Medical supplies, pools, food and trained staff and volunteers

Costs to feed and care for a recovering bird vary by species, but ranges from $10 to $50 a bird per day.

Please help us continue to rescue these birds. Your donation will be matched, dollar for dollar, through December 31, doubling your impact on helping birds.

Thank you in advance. Your support means so much to us.

Sincerely,

Jay Holcomb, Executive Director
International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC)

 

P.S. If you prefer to mail a check, please send it to:

IBRRC
c/o 2010 Gift
4369 Cordelia Road
Fairfield, CA 94534
Phone: (707) 207-0380 Ext. 109

November 6, 2009

When it rains, it pours

Dear friends,

As you know, International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC) is in the midst of a large-scale rescue effort to save seabirds threatened by a massive algal bloom off the coast of Oregon and Washington State. After more than a week of 17-hour days, our dedicated staff and volunteers have washed over 400 birds. 150 have already been returned to the wild.

In the midst of our efforts we were deeply saddened to hear that a U.S. Coast Guard crew, colleagues to those that so generously gave their time and resources to airlift these birds to safety, were involved in a fatal air crash near San Diego while flying the same C-130 plane. On the same day, International Bird Rescue was activated by the Oiled Wildlife Care Network to respond to an oil spill in San Francisco Bay and we still have rescue teams in the field as I write. It has been quite a week.

This unusual algae event has had all the wildlife casualties but none of the financial resources available to save seabirds from oil spills so it is your incredible generosity that is giving these beautiful birds a second chance.

To date, we have raised two-thirds of the money we need to complete our mission and save these birds. I want to personally thank you for helping us get so far.

If you have not yet donated to save these birds and are inspired to do so we still need your help to find the remaining $15,000 to buy food for the birds, essential medical supplies and equipment. If you have already given but know someone who may wish to make a lifesaving contribution, please help us spread the word by forwarding on this message. Please donate now

We are all deeply touched by your kindness and generosity. Thank you for answering the call of these majestic marine birds.

Sincerely,

Jay Holcomb
, Executive Director
International Bird Rescue Research Center (IBRRC)





Above photo: A Red-throated Loon caught in deadly sea-slime gets washed and rinsed. (Photo: Paul Kelway/IBRRC)

August 7, 2008

Crisis continues for Brown Pelicans along coast

In the last few days our Northern California rehabilitation center, located in Fairfield, received another 25 brown pelicans from the Santa Cruz area. That makes a total of 137 pelicans this year in Northern California alone and 115 of those pelicans have come in since June 15th! Until recently they have been mostly young birds that are learning to fish and are feeding on large schools of anchovies and sardines that are moving along the California coastline. As of today, more than 30 of the birds that have come to our center are suffering from injuries due to fishing hooks and monofilament line entanglement.

Overview of the Current Crisis Situation

For those of you that don’t remember, in 2002 IBRRC received 200 injured pelicans from Santa Cruz within a month because large numbers of brown pelicans were feeding on anchovies under the Santa Cruz piers. Fisherman fishing from the piers can catch up to five small fish at a time by basically creating a long line system where each line has up to five leads with hooks on the ends of them. The lines are dropped from very high piers and are often pulled up with up to 5 wiggling fish on them. Pelicans see this as a free meal and grab them, becoming entangled. The fishermen get annoyed, cut the lines and then the pelicans are found on the wharf and local beaches with injuries and entanglements. This is happening right now!

In 2002 IBRRC worked with local government and California Fish & Game to temporarily close the Santa Cruz wharf to fishing until the bait fish moved out of the area. This tactic was successful and ended the fishing tackle entanglements. We are again asking the regulatory agencies to temporarily close these areas to fishing. This year the problem is much worse as three different piers are being used for fishing and literally thousands of brown pelicans are feeding on the fish. Two of the piers are now closed but one remains open to fishing. One fisherman complained to reporters that he is catching a pelican every 20 minutes and cutting the line.

Media report: ABC-TV: Pelicans getting fatally snared in Capitola

IBRRC as the Hub for west coast pelican rehabilitation

IBRRC has the largest facilities and most advanced program for pelican and sea bird rehabilitation along the west coast of the US. Each of our rehabilitation centers is equipped with a one hundred foot long pelican flight aviary. These aviaries are specifically built for pelicans and provide them flight rehabilitation. Each aviary can hold up to 75 birds at a time and both are in full use right now.

Your support is desperately needed

As I write this appeal there are 70 brown pelicans at our Northern California center, in Fairfield, receiving treatment for fishing tackle injuries and other problems and an equal amount at our Southern California facility in San Pedro. Each pelican eats up to 5 pounds of fish a day. The low estimate of a single pelican’s cost to rehabilitate is $20.00 per day. In truth, the cost is much more for those that require antibiotics and further care. I am asking for your financial support again to help us in this crisis situation.

We have set up many ways for our supporters to contribute. Donations in any amount you wish are always welcome. You may Adopt a Pelican or become a Pelican Partner. Becoming a Pelican Partner provides you with the opportunity to receive a private tour of one of our facilities and join our staff or volunteers at the release of the pelican that you have adopted and helped. I urge you to help us rehabilitate these pelicans. Share this information with friends and encourage their involvement. Help us: Adopt-a-Pelican or Donate

Thank you from all the staff and volunteers at IBRRC for your help.

Jay Holcomb

Executive Director
International Bird Rescue Research Center, IBRRC

February 25, 2008

High court hears Exxon Valdez oil spill suit

Nearly 14 years after Exxon was ordered to pay $5 billion dollars because of the damages done to people and their livelyhood during the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the nation’s top court is scheduled to hear the final appeal this week.

The U.S. Supreme Court will listen to arguments this coming Wednesday from the 1994 judgment that awarded residents and fishermen the huge award. The award has been reviewed three times by a district judge and twice by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, based in San Francisco. In December 2006, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its final ruling, setting the punitive damages award at $2.5 billion.

In the meantime, 20% of the more than 30,000 fishermen, Native Alaskans, cannery workers and others who triumphed in the Anchorage, Alaska court that day in 1994 are now dead.

Following the 1989 oil spill, more than 11 million gallons spilled. An estimated 300 bald eagles died and another 200,000 common murres perished. Scores of other whales, otters, salmon and invertebrates also died in the aftermath of the spill that hit Prince William Sound and the surrounding areas.

Members of IBRRC’s response team spent nearly six months in Alaska helping care for oiled birds in the spill. See IBRRC report

Read more on the MSNBC website

Also read, plantiff’s law firm discussion of the case