Every Bird Matters
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July 30, 2014

Patient of the week: White-faced Ibis

"White-Faced Ibis Juvenile in care at SF Bay Center"
WFIBPhoto by Cheryl Reynolds

This juvenile White-faced Ibis was found near Natomas, CA with a broken wing and brought to an animal shelter on July 27 before transfer to our San Francisco Bay center. The bird has a fractured radius and ulna; our veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, has pinned the injury, and the ibis is currently recovering in a small, quiet  enclosure within our warm ICU. Ibises do very well in care, and the prognosis is cautiously optimistic.

You can see this ibis live on our BirdCam.

This may be the first ibis we’ve had at the center since a 2007 incident when a White-faced Ibis colony in a Sacramento Valley rice field was disturbed, leading us to care for 78 live babies and 100 eggs.

Read about this story via our archives.

Ibis Adoption

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Adult White-faced Ibis, photo by Dan Pancamo via Wikimedia Commons

June 26, 2014

Patient of the week: Baby Pied-billed Grebe

"Pied-Billed Grebe 14-2060 chick in care at SF Bay Center"
Photos by Cheryl Reynolds PBGR

This week, International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay center received its first Pied-billed Grebe chick of the year.

Weighing about as much as eight pennies upon intake, the tiny bird was found alone at Riverfront Regional Park in Windsor, CA and transferred to us by our partners at the Bird Rescue Center in Santa Rosa.

We’re feeding this orphan plenty of fish every half hour in our intensive care unit and have administered antibiotics.

An adult Pied-billed Grebe was a patient of the week back in March. Check out what these birds look like all grown up here.

"Pied-Billed Grebe 14-2060 chick in care at SF Bay Center"

"Pied-Billed Grebe 14-2060 chick in care at SF Bay Center"

June 19, 2014

#TBT: Jay saving birds during the 2002 Prestige Spill in Spain

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You can leave a remembrance of Jay here. Details on a memorial event will be announced soon.

May 17, 2014

Save the date! Alex and Ani is throwing a charity event for us on June 5…

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Click invite to enlarge

Our friends at Alex and Ani in the San Francisco Bay Area saw the recent baby heron story, as well as news about the sheer number of baby animals in our care, and knew they wanted to help.

On Thursday, June 5, Alex and Ani’s new Emeryville location will be hosting a Charity by Design event with proceeds benefiting International Bird Rescue. Stop by and say hi! There will be plenty of lite bites, refreshments and great info on what we do to save wildlife. 15% of all sales will go directly to benefit our efforts.

See you there!

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January 21, 2014

Remembering Molly Richardson

Molly RichardsonOne of our fellow wildlife champions passed over the weekend. Molly Richardson of Native Animal Rescue (NAR) in the Live Oak area of Santa Cruz County died at the age of 85.

Molly was the “patron saint of the county’s sick, injured and abandoned wildlife,” according to an article in the Santa Cruz Sentinel newspaper.

“A native of India who came to America by way of New Zealand, Richardson settled in Pacific Grove, where she was a school teacher. But her retirement and a move to Live Oak would bring a second career, converting a home into a hub for Native Animal Rescue, a network of big-hearted and often brave volunteers nursing pelicans, song birds, raccoons, possums, bats, foxes and even skunks back to health.”

NAR under Molly’s direction was often the first responder to helping rescue injured and sick Brown Pelicans in the Santa Cruz/Monterey areas. She and her team would stabilize the birds and often arrange transportation to our San Francisco Bay Center.

Thank you, Molly, for giving all animals a much-needed voice in this world. We follow your example every day.

December 11, 2013

24-hour match: Your gift feeds twice as many baby birds today!

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Dear Friend,

Encountering a baby bird in the care of International Bird Rescue’s wildlife centers is a bittersweet experience: Here’s a beautiful new life, but one that now must survive without its parents.

These animals always inspire us, and we often hear how they inspire you too. “I read about what you are doing and it just touches my heart,” a woman named Julie recently wrote to us. “I’m on social security, I don’t have a leg, and they just raised my rent. Maybe things will get better. You never know.”

Despite her hard times, Julie found it in her heart to send what she could — a small amount that speaks volumes about her support for wildlife. We were bowled over by her spirit of generosity.

Thanks to an angel donor, Julie’s gift will be doubled today, as well as your gift to save orphaned and other wild birds. Your support during this critical time is most appreciated.

If you’ve already given this year, thank you so very much. In just a few months, these precious young birds will arrive at our doorstep — by the hundreds. They come to us for any numberKilldeer, chick IMG_5128 copy-M of reasons. Mother ducks get hit by a car or separated by busy roadways. Fledging egrets fall from nests in trees high above traffic medians. Whatever the species, we treat all these baby birds with the expert care and reverence they deserve. Will you help these animals today?

We’re proud to say that we give countless orphaned birds a second chance with food and medical care. We minimize human interaction and place the birds with surrogate parents or other orphans of the same species to ensure the best possible chance for successful reintroduction into nature — always our bottom-line goal.

Every orphaned bird has a story. With your help, we can give that story the happy ending it deserves.

Best wishes this holiday season,

Jay Holcomb-Signature

Jay Holcomb
Executive Director

P.S. – Prefer to give over the phone? Call us at 510-289-1472 and we’ll handle your gift right away.

International Bird Rescue is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Your contribution is tax-deductible to the full extent allowed by law. Tax ID: 94-1739027

December 10, 2013

Shop Amazon, help birds

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Good news! International Bird Rescue is now a featured charity in the AmazonSmile program, which donates a portion of your purchases to nonprofits.

Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible Amazon Smile purchases to International Bird Rescue whenever you shop on AmazonSmile, which has the same products and services as offered by Amazon.com.

If you are an Amazon aficionado, you may want to also check out our Amazon.com Wish Lists, which feature a wide variety of products we depend upon every day. You can choose from our Los Angeles or San Francisco Bay center Wish Lists.

Every donation matters! Thank you so much for your support!

November 28, 2013

Wishing you a very Happy Thanksgiving

Photo of Sandhill Cranes

Photo: Sandhill Cranes by Graham McGeorge

Dear Friends,

This year, we are deeply thankful that you are a part of our mission to give injured, oiled and orphaned wild birds the care they deserve.

From all of us at International Bird Rescue, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.

September 23, 2013

Great Blue Heron released at Ballona Wetlands

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A Great Blue Heron leaping to freedom when released at Ballona Creek, photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

If you love Great Blue Herons, we know you’ll fully appreciate the resiliency of one amazing bird recently in our care.

A few months ago, International Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles center received a heron with dual misfortunes: It was both oiled and suffering from GHBEsubsequent burns on about 25% of its body.

Our wildlife rehab technician team washed the animal, and our veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, surgically repaired the bird’s most severe injury where the skin along its spine was dead and adhered to the spine itself. Surgical procedures were also necessary to heal a wound on the bird’s keel as well as a thigh wound that required debridement to remove dead muscle tissue and a skin graft.

After many weeks of healing, this heron was released at the Ballona Wetlands in Los Angeles, home to a wide array of birds, including egrets, grebes and many species of shorebirds. Rehabilitation technician Kylie Clatterbuck reports that the bird was released at a spot in the wetlands where there was another Great Blue Heron nearby, as well as a Great Egret.

Below, you can see this heron in its new habitat, as well as a photo of the bird upon its initial exam at our Los Angeles center.

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Heron release photo by Kylie Clatterbuck; inset photo by Paul Berry

September 11, 2013

Update on wildlife response in Alberta bitumen release

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Several weeks ago, International Bird Rescue was activated to assist in collection and rehabilitation efforts for wildlife affected by the bitumen release at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited Primrose Project in northern Alberta.

Working alongside The Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton and the Oiled Wildlife Society of British Columbia, we currently have MAPthree technicians in the field — two capture technicians and one field-stabilization technician. As some bird species begin their fall migration as early as July, our team is hard at work to deter animals from the affected area, using such methods as air horns and “bear bangers.” Only a few flyovers have been reported in recent days, however. The field team has deployed many traps to collect birds found in the area for care and/or relocation.

We also have several response team members working as part of a nine-person rehabilitation team at the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton. A total of 94 animals have been brought into care during this event, with bird species including Ring-necked Ducks, a Great Horned Owl, American Coots, Green-winged Teals and a Black Tern.

As of Monday, 66 animals (including 23 muskrats) have been released far from the affected area, with more still in care.

Founded in 1971, International Bird Rescue has extensive experience in oiled wildlife events around the world. During the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we co-managed oiled bird rehabilitation centers in four states as part of a large-scale response to the incident that involved federal and state agencies, industry and non-governmental organizations.

Find out more about our response program here. We’ll keep you posted on the response effort via this blog.

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Update: Below, photos of beaver release at a location far removed from the bitumen-affected area, photos by Judith Paquin, communications and development director for the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton.

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