Every Bird Matters
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News

December 31, 2019

So Many Birds To Celebrate This Year!

Dear Bird Rescue Supporter,

As this year comes to an end, we want to remind you that we have a lot to celebrate in 2019!

With your support, our accomplishments became yours:

• In July our team mobilized as a mission of mercy to rescue nearly 100 baby Herons and Egrets from a fallen tree in Oakland.

• Because of a band return, we learned that an oiled King Eider from a spill in 1996 we helped rescue, treat and release, lived another 23 years in the wild. From all reports, this beautifully colored male sea duck may be the oldest lived King Eider. This band return underscored our long held belief that properly treated oiled birds can and will live long lives beyond capture and cleaning.

• With loving, restorative care, a majestic Brown Pelican with severe pouch laceration is again back in the wild.

Before time runs out, won’t you make one more tax-deductible gift this year?

With your encouragement and generous donations, our life saving work will continue to grow in 2020!

With best wishes for a Happy New Year,

JD Bergeron
Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

December 28, 2019

2019 Patient of the Year: Brown Pelican Y41 With Severe Pouch Laceration

The results are in. It was a tight race, but a victor has emerged!

The 2019 Patient of the Year is the Brown Pelican with the severe pouch laceration. It clearly made the biggest impact on our Bird Rescue family this year, winning 30% of the overall public vote.

“…The bird’s pouch was laid open on both sides up and back onto her neck, completely cut loose from the rest of her mouth. Although she survived the initial injury, she was starving to death because she was unable to eat…”

Blog post Oct 2019

This pelican is not only a prime example of the impacts humans can have on wildlife, but also the remarkable resiliency of these majestic creatures. It also shows that the best efforts by concerned individuals can give a gravely injured bird a second chance at life.

Thank you to all of you who voted, to the skilled staff and volunteers whose attentive care got this pelican (blue-banded Y41) through to release, and to the generous donors without whom this work would not be possible.

This patient was just one of more than 3,500 birds we helped this year! If this story inspires you to take action, and help other birds get a second chance, please join us: Make a donation to International Bird Rescue today to help us continue to rescue waterbirds in crisis and create more success stories like this one!

For our 2019 Patient of the Year contest, we asked you WHY you voted for the bird you did – many of you provided us with inspiring answers. This is Wordie graphic using your own words describing why these birds & our work matters to you. Thank you!

 

 

December 24, 2019

Warmest Holiday Greetings From Bird Rescue

Dear Bird Rescue supporters,

As we close out 2019, we would like to wish you the happiest of holidays!

May the New Year be filled with warmth, peace, happiness, and harmony with each other and our natural home.

Thanks again for all your generous support of our mission,

Sincerely,

Team International Bird Rescue

 

December 20, 2019

Oldest Known King Eider Found 23 Years After Oil Spill Care

Male King Eiders are super colorful sea ducks commonly found in Arctic waters. CC photo by Ron Knight

A new bird banding report shows something truly remarkable: the oldest known King Eider – a species of sea duck – was a 24-year-old oil spill survivor cared for by International Bird Rescue. This finding proves once again that rehabilitated, formerly-oiled birds can survive many years after treatment and release back to the wild.

The latest discovery involves a male King Eider that was oiled as an adult during an oil spill in Alaska in 1996. The recovered bird survived 23 years after oiling and release, and according to federal banding information, this may well be the oldest known King Eider.

According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Bird Banding Lab, which administers the scientific banding or ringing of wild birds in the U.S., the previously oldest recorded King Eider was an unoiled female that was at least 22 years 1 month old when she was recaptured and re-released during banding operations in Nunavut, Canada.

In 1996 rescued King Eiders were cleaned of oil after being flown to Anchorage from the Pribilof Islands. Photo © International Bird Rescue

This important news underscores what Bird Rescue has been advocating from its beginnings: oiled birds can and DO survive to live normal lives when rehabilitated after oiling, with appropriate resources and skilled staff. This is especially true when wildlife experts follow the protocols that have been refined over our nearly 50-year history.

Watch the video: Every Release Matters

“Bird Rescue has developed and remains at the forefront of the State of the Science for oiled wildlife treatment and rehabilitation,’ said Catherine Berg, NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator for Alaska. Berg was one of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Alaska Oil Spill Response Coordinators. (Ron Britton was also worked as the National USFWS Oil Spill Coordinator and managed the Citrus spill along with Pamela Bergmann at the U.S. Department of Interior’s Office of Environmental Policy & Compliance, and Claudia Slater of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.)

“Seeing this kind of evidence of rehabilitated bird survival is truly a tribute to their dedication to the advancement of the science and to improving the care of injured birds.” Berg added.

The long-lived eider is also a testament to both Bird Rescue’s and the State of Alaska’s commitment to the successful concept of having a centralized response center to care for affected wildlife, rather than attempting the care and cleaning of animals in a remote, inaccessible location. All the birds from this spill were transported from a remote island for care in a centralized facility run by Bird Rescue in Anchorage.

The long-lived King Eider carried the Federal Band #1347-54951.

The reported King Eider was originally oiled during the M/V Citrus Oil Spill that began in mid-February 1996 in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands around St. Paul Island in the Bering Sea, approximately 300 miles from the nearest mainland, and 750 miles from Anchorage. One hundred eighty-six birds, mainly eiders, were rescued near St. Paul and transported by U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft to Bird Rescue’s Anchorage emergency response center. After medical stabilization, washing, and rehabilitation, the cleaned seabirds were again transported (a four hour flight) back to St. Paul Island, where their release was celebrated by the community and with the participation of schoolchildren.

Bird Rescue is proud of its work and the body of knowledge regarding the care of oiled wildlife that it has cultivated and shared since its inception in 1971. Data such as band returns on these species provide critical feedback to our rehabilitation processes, and clearly we are on the right track.

The deceased eider (Federal Band #1347-54951) was taken near English Bay on St. Paul Island earlier this year. The metal band number was reported to the USGS Bird Banding Lab and they shared the information with Bird Rescue.

Male King Eiders are known for their very ornate and distinctive plumage. The male’s black and white feathers are accented by a reddish orange bill, bluish crown and greenish cheek. They are found in Arctic waters.

This is the fourth King Eider from the 1996 spill that has been reported through the Bird Banding Lab.

December 15, 2019

Vote for the Bird Patient of the Year 2019

This year at International Bird Rescue, we have cared for over 3,400 birds and counting! We have selected five of our favorite patients from 2019, but we need your help to decide which will be Patient of the Year! Take a look at their stories below, and then click the vote button to let us know which one you like best!


 

Baby Lesser Flamingo

International Bird Rescue sent two teams to South Africa to help care for baby Lesser Flamingos abandoned due to severe drought conditions in the area. The little flamingos had to be carefully hand fed and receive regular checkups to monitor their development.

This little flamingo was the smallest one in the flock at the rescue station where Center Manager, Kylie Clatterbuck, was stationed. She gave him special attention and made sure he was getting plenty to eat and growing up as well as all of the others.

Bird Rescue was happy to be able to help our partners on the opposite side of the globe as they took action to rescue these birds in crisis!

 


 

Oakland Heronry Rescue: Black-crowned Night-Heron

This Black-crowned Night-Heron was rescued when Bird Rescue team members rushed to the scene of a fallen heronry tree in downtown Oakland in July of this year. He was brought to our SF Bay-Delta wildlife center along with 89 other young herons and egrets and raised in our care.

A voracious eater from day one, this little one quickly began gaining weight. As he grew, our staff carefully monitored his progress and provided him with daily nutritional supplements to make sure he was developing properly.

After more than a month in care, this young Black-crowned Night-Heron was successfully returned to his natural home in the wild!

 


 

Baby Western Grebe

This fuzzy Western Grebe hatchling stole everyone’s hearts when it arrived at our wildlife center. While we care for hundreds of adult Western Grebes each year, their babies are very rare patients for us.

This unusual patient required our team of staff and volunteers to be innovative with care techniques and housing setups because they had to balance the baby’s need for food and interaction with her need to stay wild and maintain perfectly waterproof feathers.

All of the hard work and creativity paid off as the baby grebe was soon full grown and ready to return to the wild. Our team drove this special patient up to Santa Barbara where she had originally been found to release her near a large flock of fellow grebes.

 


 

Laysan Albatross

Albatross were on our minds this year as 2019 began with our Executive Director, JD Bergeron, assisting in the 2019 Nesting Albatross Census on Midway Atoll.

Much to our surprise, a Laysan Albatross was brought to our wildlife center in Southern California in April after it had been found stowing away on a boat. After a brief stay and a few good meals, the albatross looked to be in excellent shape and was ready for release.

Laysan Albatross need to be released out at sea, so we teamed up with the U.S. Coast Guard to take this special patient out on a boat and return it to its natural home in the wild. See a video of the release HERE!

 


 

Brown Pelican

In September, an adult female Brown Pelican was brought to us with a gruesome bilateral pouch laceration. With her pouch hanging in tatters and the back of her mouth laid open, she was unable to feed and would have soon starved to death had help not come along.

Our veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, has repaired scores of pouch lacerations over the years, from simple straight cuts to complicated shredded messes. Her experience treating these types of injuries helped this pelican’s repair and healing go exactly as planned, and this gorgeous bird healed her devastating wound like a champ.

After two surgical procedures and a few weeks of recuperation, this Brown Pelican was successfully released, now sporting a bright blue band reading “Y41”.

 


Three (3) lucky voters will be selected to receive a FREE Bird Rescue 2020 calendar! Vote and enter your mailing address.

November 14, 2019

Barbara Callahan Honored With Oil Spill Task Force’s 2019 Legacy Award

Barbara Callahan in action – leading a wildlife response training. Photo by Ken Wilson, APSC

Barbara Callahan of International Bird Rescue was honored this week with a 2019 Legacy Award by the Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force. Barbara is Bird Rescue’s Senior Director of Response Services. She was recognized for her sustained excellence in devoting more than 25 years of her life to oiled wildlife response and for her leadership role at many of the major oil spills throughout the world.

The Legacy Awards honor individuals and organizations that successfully implement exemplary oil spill prevention, preparedness, or response projects. We define such exemplary projects as successful efforts that go beyond regulatory requirements to prevent, prepare for, or respond to oil spills.

The award was presented at the Oil Spill Task Force‘s annual meeting on November 13, 2019 in Bellingham, Washington.

Barbara Callahan has spent more than 25 years as a leader in wildlife oil spill response.

Barbara has a wealth of international experience working in the emergency wildlife response and management. She received her B. S. in Biological Science from the University of Alaska. She has worked in oiled wildlife response, response management and rehabilitation of aquatic animals over the course of 20 years and is certified in Federal Emergency Management.

Since 1997 she has been the Response Services Director at Bird Rescue and has held the position of Bird Unit Deputy Leader in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010; the Incident Command Wildlife Coordinator for the Rena Spill in New Zealand in 2011; and has been the on-scene coordinator in numerous other national and international spill events.

Barbara has authored multiple papers on seabird rehabilitation and oil spill response. She has also nationally and internationally presented at wildlife and other conferences.

Barbara Callahan working during the 2000 Treasure Oil Spill response in South Africa. Photo by Jon Hrusa – IFAW

November 8, 2019

A Bird Lovers Night Of Generosity & Masquerade Fun

Attendees strike a pose with their Night-Heron Masquerade masks at a Bird Rescue fundraising event in San Francisco. Photo by Gary Wagner

Shirl Simpson, left, the Branch Manager of the U.S. Post Office in downtown Oakland, CA with JD Bergeron, International Bird Rescue’s Executive Director. Photo by Gary Wagner

The Night Heron Masquerade was a huge success and we are proud to announce that event raised over $80,000! The October 26, 2019 event was filled to capacity as 150 attendees cam to support International Bird Rescue’s ongoing wildlife programs.

Thank you so much to all of those who attended and who donated, and a special thank you to our event sponsors and silent auction donors. We had a fantastic time celebrating with such a fun group of supporters, staff and volunteers. Each attendee took home a bird mask of their choice and a poster from the event in San Francisco.

Shirl Simpson, the Branch Manager, of the U.S. Post Office in downtown Oakland, CA was given special recognition for her efforts in helping support the Oakland Heronry Rescue. Nearly a hundred birds, Black-crowned Night-Herons and Snowy Egrets were rescued after a tree snapped in front of the post office sending baby birds and their nests tumbling to the sidewalk.

A big thank you also to Gary Wagner Photography for the great attendee photos, to Tony Corman & Laura Klein for providing the live music, and to Michael Warner for creating the event artwork!

Executive Director JD Bergeron was master of ceremonies. Photo by Russ Curtis–International Bird Rescue

Handmade bird masks were handed out to each attendee. The masks were created by volunteer artists. Photo by Gary Wagner

September 9, 2019

Team Yes We Peli-CAN! With Community Support, Conquers the Bridge Once Again

On Labor Day 45 members of Team Yes We Peli-CAN! participated in the annual Conquer the Bridge Race in San Pedro, CA.

Bird Rescue supporters in right blue team shirts could be spotted on two iconic California bridges on Labor Day, September 2, 2019.

Team sponsors included Chevron and Bakeology.

In San Pedro, 45 members of  Team Yes We Peli-CAN! walked and ran over the Vincent Thomas Bridge in the 11th annual Conquer the Bridge Race. This community event, part of the region’s Fleet Week celebration, draws thousands of participants and offers the perfect opportunity for Bird Rescue to raise awareness of the birds that share our local habitat and the work that we do for them.

At the same time, volunteers from our San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center and their mascot dog, Finnegan, walked together over the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in support of the team’s efforts. “I was thrilled to see so many members of our Bird Rescue family united, here in San Pedro and hundreds of miles away in Northern California, taking on this physical challenge and being an active part of our communities and promoting the important work that we do for the birds” said Angie Trumbo, Yes We Peli-CAN! Team captain.

All summer long, Team Yes We Peli-CAN! Has worked to fundraise in support of animal care at our wildlife centers with a goal of reaching $15,000 by race day. Thanks to their efforts, a generous team sponsorship from Chevron, and numerous donations from the public and Bird Rescue supporters, we surpassed our goal, bringing in just under $16,000!

With another successful run as Team Yes We Peli-CAN! under our belts, we look forward to next year and bringing the team back for Conquer the Bridge 2020!

Runners and walkers on the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, CA. Photos by International Bird Rescue

 

September 3, 2019

You’re Invited to the October 26th Night-Heron Masquerade in San Francisco

Calling all night birds to join us for an upbeat Bird Rescue celebration on Saturday, October 26th from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m., on the beautiful Ohana Floor of Salesforce East in San Francisco. Buy Tickets Now

Come to the event to share your love of birds as well as living plants on Salesforce’a Ohana East 30th floor.

The Masquerade will feature delicious vegetarian flavors, an open bar with wine and beer, amazing auction items, and fun opportunities to celebrate the rescue and rehabilitation of San Francisco Bay Area birds. The event is a perfect starting point for your Halloween weekend celebrations, or as a classy, uplifting evening all on its own.

A selection of masks will be available to attendees. There is no need to bring a mask! Cocktail attire is suggested.

The Ohana Room in Salesforce East offers a gorgeous setting with lovely 30th floor views of San Francisco and beyond, over 3000 live plants, 65 different species! In the decor, a self-playing piano, and a giant screen for photographic highlights of our bird rescue efforts. The venue is easily accessible by BART and MUNI.

Please note the deadline to register for this event is by Tuesday, October 22nd with a full name and an e-mail address for all attendees and guests. A government-issued photo ID is required at the entrance. Unfortunately, Salesforce does not allow day-of additions ahead of the event. The event is at 350 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. The venue is easily accessible by BART and MUNI.

If you would like to become an event sponsor, please contact Toni Arkoosh Pinsky at toni.pinsky@ bird­rescue.org or JD Bergeron at 510.289.1472.

The Ohana Floor in Salesforce East offers a gorgeous setting with over 3000 live plants and views of San Francisco Bay. Photos by Russ Curtis – International Bird Rescue

 

August 19, 2019

Release of the Week: Snowy Egrets and Black-crowned Night-Herons

A bevy of Snowy Egrets, many from the Oakland Heronry Rescue in July, were released this month at Arrowhead Marsh in Oakland. Photo by Cheryl Reynolds/International Bird Rescue

With supporters looking on, another group of Snowy Egrets and Black-crowned Night Herons, were released back to the wild last week at Arrowhead Marsh in Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline.

A pair of Black-crowned Night-Herons saunter out of cages back to the wild spaces in Oakland. Photo by Cheryl Reynolds/International Bird Rescue

Most of the released birds were part of the Oakland Heronry Rescue that began on July 10th after a large ficus tree containing a rookery of 50+ nests, split at the trunk and toppled in front of the downtown Oakland U.S. Post Office at Jackson and 13th Streets. The rookery included many nesting birds with baby egrets and herons, some of them which spilled onto sidewalks below.

Over a three day stretch, a total of 90 birds were rescued – including 51 Snowy Egrets, 22 Black-crowned Night-Herons, and 17 eggs.

You can still donate via the GivingGrid!

Thankfully a concerned citizen noticed these birds in crisis and immediately called our San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center to come to the rescue. A Bird Rescue team, including JD Bergeron, Executive Director and Michelle Bellizzi, Response Manager, was on the scene right away at Jackson at 13th Streets and began gently scooping up the surviving birds and preparing them for transport to our clinic in Fairfield.

Read: It always starts with a phone call

After the remaining tree was deemed unsafe for the public as well as the nesting birds, the team worked alongside a tree service that helped trim branches and collect all the remaining eggs and birds in nests.

“This rescue has been an epic journey for us all–on-scene rescuers, partners, staff, volunteers, donors, and supporters!” said JD Bergeron.

“The plight of these fallen birds caught the attention of many who dare to hope that people can still come together to make good things happen. TV, radio, blogs, and newspapers helped to carry this good news story in the midst of so much bad news,” Bergeron added.

Thanks to our generous donors, Bird Rescue was able to raise enough in donations to cover the food, medicine, and daily care for these young herons and egrets. But our work doesn’t end with these 90 birds — we provide wildlife rescue and rehabilitation programs 365 days a year, and our 3,500+ patients each year don’t come with insurance.

The support of the community means the world to us and reinforces to us the belief that each of us, every day, must take action to protect the natural home of wildlife and ourselves. You can still help us with a donation

A Snowy Egret gets ready to fly off in Arrowhead Marsh in Oakland. Photo by Cheryl Reynolds/International Bird Rescue

August 13, 2019

It Always Starts With A Phone Call

Baby Snowy Egrets, many that had tumbled out of nests onto a downtown Oakland sidewalk, were gently scopped up and put into boxes for transport to Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center. Photo by Michelle Bellizzi–International Bird Rescue

Note: First person post about the Oakland Heronry Rescue in July 2019 by Michelle Bellizzi, Bird Rescue’s Response Manager

After the ficus tree collapsed, Oakland city crews cleaned up the fallen branches. Photo by Michelle Bellizzi–International Bird Rescue

On Wednesday July 10, 2019, I’d just arrived home from work and was getting dinner together, when The Call came in. International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center Manager Isabel Luevano had picked up a message on the hospital phone describing a sad scene: a large ficus tree next to the downtown Oakland U.S. Post Office and used for nesting by the city’s iconic Black-crowned Night-Herons and Snowy Egrets had collapsed, and numerous baby birds had fallen with their nests across a city sidewalk.

Luckily, I live just a short distance away from the site and was able to grab my partner and convince him that saving baby birds was *the* thing to do in the evening, and together we headed down to the site. On our way, I received a text from Response Services Director Barbara Callahan, who had picked up a call on our 24-hour Oil Spill Emergency Hotline about the situation. We were met at the site by JD Bergeron, Bird Rescue’s Executive Director, and his partner Travis (Bird Rescue has a wonderful tradition of wrangling our significant others to step in when needed, and all of our husbands, wives, and partners are angels!), as well as concerned locals and city workers prepared to clean up the mess.

We quickly discovered that the tree in question had split in half, and the City needed to clean the fallen branches from the sidewalk. The remaining half of the tree was in imminent danger of falling as well and would need to be removed.

One of the people on-site was Shirl Simpson, the Branch Manager of the Post Office, and it only took a few moments for Shirl to become one of my favorite people in the world. Upon seeing the downed tree, the nestlings, and the remaining bird nests in the tree, Shirl said unequivocally: “We are going to save these birds – these are OUR birds, and we’re not going to let anything happen to them.” Shirl was the person who had contacted our Emergency Line – she had remembered a Channel 7 story on Bird Rescue and went to “Seven on Your Side” to find our number.

The sight of the tree was intimidating and heartbreaking: half of the tree was down with baby birds in the branches on the ground, and the half that remained standing had approximately 40 nests visible in the canopy…which was 30 feet up and inaccessible without a cherry picker.

“We are going to save these birds – these are OUR birds, and we’re not going to let anything happen to them.” said Shirl Simpson (seated), the Branch Manager of the Post Office, along with JD Bergeron holding a rescued Black-crown Night-Heron. Photo by Cheryl Reynolds–International Bird Rescue

On Wednesday evening, our job was clear: rescue the babies that had fallen and clear the sidewalk, and work on a plan for the remaining tree on Thursday. We sprang into action working alongside the Oakland City workers, carefully searching through the downed branches to extract any babies and handing the cleared branches to the city workers for chipping. We rescued 18 baby herons and egrets, and cleared the downed half of the tree just before dark. The birds were taken back to our Fairfield facility by 9:30 pm.

Later on Thursday and Friday, JD and I returned to the site to collect additional birds and to oversee the complete removal of the tree. Because the tree itself was on Postal Service property, Shirl hired Davey Tree service to remove the birds from their nests and capture unflighted birds in the tree canopy *and* cut the tree in sections as they removed the birds.

JD and I stayed on the ground playing outfielder, collecting the birds from the workers in the picker, and identifying areas in the canopy with birds so the worker was aware of birds moving through the foliage and nest areas. Because of the slow nature of the work, birds were transported to the facility midday and in the evening.

Interestingly, as the workers moved through the tree south to north, the birds got older! Apparently most of the nests on the south side of the tree were nestlings, and the north side of the tree housed the birds that were **just about ready to fledge**. As less and less tree was available to hide in, the birds congregated at the north edge and several proved to be good fliers and able to fly from tree to tree, and the decision was made to not capture them. By noon on Friday, the last branch had been cut, and the last birds were driven to our center so the real work could begin!

News Media Stories

Black-crowned Night-Herons, Snowy Egrets released into wild after surviving Oakland tree collapse, ABC-7-News

Using a cherry picker, Davey Tree Service, helped safely remove other birds and nests before trimming the tree back in front of the Post Office at 13th and Jackson Streets in downtown Oakland. Photo by Michelle Bellizzi–International Bird Rescue

July 12, 2019

Bird Rescue Jumps Into Action in Oakland – Rescuing Baby Birds from Fallen Tree

Birds rescued in Oakland include 50 Snowy Egret chicks and nestlings. All are now in care at Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center. 📷 > Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

Disaster struck this week at a large heron and egret rookery in downtown Oakland, CA. A large ficus tree split and partially toppled on Wednesday, sending dozens of baby birds tumbling to the ground.

A concerned citizen saw these birds in crisis and immediately called our San Francisco Bay-Delta wildlife center to come to the rescue. A Bird Rescue team, including JD Bergeron, Executive Director and Michelle Bellizzi, Response Manager, was on the scene right away at Jackson at 13th Streets and began collecting the surviving birds to take into care.

By the end of day on Friday, July 12, teams had rescued a total of 90 birds – including 51 Snowy Egrets, 22 Black-crowned Night-Herons, and 17 eggs.

Meanwhile, back at the clinic, staff and volunteers worked late into the night to prepare special enclosures for the incoming patients and take care of their immediate needs as they arrived.

We are so grateful to be able to care for all of these precious baby birds but rely on the public’s support to cover the costs of care for all of our patients.

Won’t you help us with a donation so these baby birds have a second chance at life?

One of the 22 Black-crowned Night-Herons rescued in Oakland is weighed during intake at our clinic in Fairfield.

What happens when a bird is rescued?

Our partners also deserve praise. They stepped forward to help us, including the Golden Gate Audubon, Oakland post office staff, law enforcement, and Davey Tree Services, the city-hired arborists to rescue the rest of the baby birds from this tree before the tree was taken down.

Our clinic assesses and stabilizes the birds; any eggs collected are put in incubators, and all chicks will need to be hand-fed by staff and volunteers multiple times a day. Each of these rescued birds will require weeks and sometimes months of care before they are able to be released back into a safe environment.

These birds – especially the Black-crowned Night-Herons– hold a special place in the heart of Oakland residents. Earlier this year, local school kids urged and won a petition to have the Oakland City Council declare the Night-Herons the official bird of Oakland. Read more

If too care for wildlife, please contribute what you can to help raise these birds in need!

Thank you for your generous support.

After the initial rescue of baby herons and egrets on Wednesday, a city crew cleans up a large part of a fallen tree in downtown Oakland, CA. IBR photo

On Thursday, working with Davey Tree Service using its cherry picker, teams helped carefuly capture heron and egret chicks and nestlings in the damaged ficus tree. 📷 > Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

Some of the Snowy Egrets rescued from the downtown Oakland rookery. 📷 > Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

JD Bergeron, Executive Director at Bird Rescue, directs rescuers while helping man a safety net to catch chicks and nestlings just in case they fall. 📷 > Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

Black-crowned Night-Herons rescued at Oakland rookery. 📷 > Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

June 21, 2019

Port of Los Angeles Wildlife Impact Mitigation Project: June 24th Presentation

What: Port of Los Angeles Wildlife Impact Mitigation Project, a special presentation: Hosted by International Bird Rescue and the Los Angeles Wildlife Center. Download Final Report PDF 3.6 MB

When: Monday, June 24, 2019 at 7 PM – 9 PM

Where: The Plaza At Cabrillo Marina, 2965 Via Cabrillo Marina, San Pedro, California 90731 Map

Thanks to a generous grant from the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation (HCBF), International Bird Rescue has conducted a study on the impacts to wildlife in the Port of Los Angeles. The study will be presented to the public on Monday evening, June 24, 2019 at 7 PM. There will also be a panel discussion with local experts. Refreshments will be served.

The study was conducted to weigh the human-generated impacts on marine wildlife at the Port of Los Angeles operations. Bird Rescue focused on the waterbirds that wade, dive, feed, and reproduce there. There had been port environmental impact reports before, but no review of wildlife incidents stretching back so far historically, or cast a net so wide.

Part of the study’s findings include education and outreach efforts that involve simple, straight-forward, and practical ways to minimize human-animal impacts (aka “Urban Wildlife Conflicts”), correctly identify common and uncommon wildlife behaviors, recognize signs of distress, and provide easy, direct, convenient resources to contact when intervention might be required.

This San Pedro event is free and open to the public.

Background

Bird Rescue and Harbor Community Benefit Foundation have built a strong partnership over the past five years, with HCBF supporting an impactful summer research internship program for several years. This year, HCBF offered Bird Rescue an opportunity to study current and historic issues affecting wildlife in and around the Port of Los Angeles, and to suggest mitigation measures. The Project is also helping to identify opportunities for further improvements to the health and safety of both marine wildlife and people.

About International Bird Rescue: In 1971 after 800,000 gallons of crude oil spilled into the bay, concerned individuals led by a registered nurse named Alice Berkner jumped into action, bringing International Bird Rescue to life. We have always had to pave a road where there is none. Staff and volunteers work with tenacity alongside clients, partners, and the public to find solutions. Today, we research best practices at our crisis response hospitals in California and Alaska and share them worldwide. Our mission is to inspire people to act toward balance with the natural world by rescuing waterbirds in crisis. We dream of a world in which every person, every day, takes action to protect the natural home of wildlife and ourselves.

 

May 31, 2019

Goleta/421 Pier Oil Release Spill Event: Anything Can Happen

Site of the spill in Goleta, CA near 421 Pier at Haskell’s Beach.

On May 29, 2019 International Bird Rescue was activated for spill response by the Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN) after approximately 80-125 gallons of crude were released into the Pacific Ocean on May 28 in Goleta, CA. This type of response is well within Bird Rescue’s wheelhouse, and we know what to expect: Within hours of notification, responders Susan Kaveggia and Jeannette Bates were on site and prepared to capture affected wildlife on May 29 and 30.

Luckily, few animals were impacted by this event, but just as in every drill or spill scenario, it pays to expect the unexpected! Several novel challenges came up during this event to keep everyone in the response thinking, including whether a pelican observed eating an oiled crab moments before capture was considered “contaminated” (ultimately, the bird was indeed considered oiled due to observable oil on its feet), and how to identify and process a deceased oiled sea cucumber (thanks to oceanic biologists!). Because we live in California and have a well-established and practiced Wildlife Response Plan and experienced responders in-state, these unexpected and unforeseen issues were resolved quickly without disrupting the response.

Bird Rescue is always ready to respond to an oil spill, whether it happens locally or abroad. In the same month as the Goleta Spill, our Response Management team traveled to Perth, Australia for SpillCon and Vancouver, BC for the Clean Pacific Conference. These events are sponsored by Industry and OSROs (Oil Spill Response Organizations) for Industry, and are a great opportunity to talk with our colleagues and share how Bird Rescue can help professionally manage and respond to wildlife affected in a spill.

 

May 22, 2019

Kids Speak Up, Take Action for Black-Crowned Night-Herons in Oakland!

Celebrating victory at city hall: Kids from Park Day School and supporters after the Black-crowned Night-Heron was named the Official Bird of the City of Oakland!

Many of the Black-crowned Night-Herons that are injured or orphaned come in to care at our San Francisco Bay-Delta Wildlife Center from rookeries in Oakland, CA.

One of the best ways to take action to protect birds in crisis is to use your voice! Even the smallest voices can make a big difference, and Bird Rescue was proud to support the efforts of elementary school students from Park Day School earlier this week as they set an example of how to speak up on behalf of birds.

It all began in 2017 when a group of third-graders learned about Black-crowned Night-Herons and the threats they face in their home town of Oakland. The city holds multiple breeding colonies for these birds, and each spring hundreds of them come into care at Bird Rescue and other wildlife rehabilitation centers when baby herons fall from their nests onto hard pavement or into busy areas. Moved by the plight of these unique birds, the students jumped into action and started a campaign to name the Black-crowned Night-Heron the official city bird of Oakland. Over the following months, they spread the word and gathered thousands of signatures.

Two years later, the hard work of these tenacious kids paid off! Bird Rescue Executive Director, JD Bergeron, had the pleasure of attending a city council meeting to support the students as they made their final presentation before city officials. A vote was held, and the motion to give the Black-crowned Night-Herons the official designation passed unanimously!

Each of us can make a difference, just like the Park Day School students. Keep an eye out for the challenges your local birds and wildlife face and raise awareness of them in your community!

“You cannot protect the environment unless you empower people, you inform them, and you help them understand that these resources are their own, that they must protect them.” – Wangari Maathai

Back in 2017, the students jumped into action and started a campaign to name the Black-crowned Night-Heron the official city bird of Oakland.