Every Bird Matters
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December 31, 2015

Help Birds Soar Farther in 2016!

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Dear Friends and Bird Allies,

Just a quick reminder that it’s the final day of 2015 and you can still give the gift of flight with a tax-deductible donation.

As a bird lover we depend on your generous gifts to keep our clinic doors open 365 days of the year to make sure the 5,000+ avian patients get the best possible care.

If you’ve already donated, thank you again for your support! If you haven’t yet, please join us and make a contribution to Bird Rescue.

With warm wishes for a wonderful New Year!

Sincerely,

JD-B-signature-300px

JD Bergeron
Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

How will you help a bird today?

Photo by Bill Steinkamp

 

December 23, 2015

Thank You For Giving Birds A Second Chance

Photo of Snowy Egrets raised at International Bird Rescue's San Francisco Bay Center.

Dear Friends and Bird Allies,

Maybe it’s snowing where you are, but we never get a snowy day around our centers. We do get our share of Snowy Egrets: 308 this year!

This year, we are counting our blessings. With thousands of birds in need of care – your generous support in 2015 has made all the difference in our ability to give these wild birds a second chance at life.

From the rescue of baby Snowy Egrets (shown) at the 9th Street Rookery in Santa Rosa… to the response to our work with pelicans, gulls, and cormorants on the Santa Barbara oil spill in May… to the volunteers who worked tirelessly helping Surf Scoters slimed by Mystery Goo in San Francisco Bay – your help has carried us through a very busy year and is so appreciated.

As the holiday season enters this week of the festival of lights and you spend more time with family and friends, we want to remind you that as a bird ally you are in our thoughts.

Happy holidays,

JDB-Sig

JD Bergeron
Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

How will you help a bird today?

Photo above: Baby Snowy Egrets. Photo by Cheryl Reynolds

 

December 15, 2015

A Year To Remember

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Baxter the Bufflehead: Before and after being cleaned of the mystery goo at the SF Bay Center. Photos: Cheryl Reynolds

Dear Friends and Bird Allies,

For 44 years, International Bird Rescue has been responding to oiled wildlife emergencies all over the world, and yet 2015 has been a year to remember!

On January 16th, we received reports of a large number of water birds on San Francisco Bay contaminated with an unknown sticky substance – including Baxter the Bufflehead duck, shown in these photos before and after his cleaning. Like many of the birds, Baxter was covered in slime, dirt, and rocks, destroying his waterproofing and his ability to maintain his body temperature. All the affected birds required intensive care and we had to develop a whole new cleaning process for this substance.

This “Mystery Goo” was not a petroleum product, which meant there was no protocol for who would take responsibility for the birds and how they would be cared for. Putting our own resources on the line, we at International Bird Rescue stepped into that void and accepted more than 300 birds. We then asked you – our dedicated supporters–for help, and you responded with much-appreciated donations!

It’s your support that enables us to put in the hard work needed to give these birds a second chance.

Thank you again for your generosity,

JDB-Sig

 

 

 

 

JD Bergeron
Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

 

December 8, 2015

How Did You Help A Bird Today?

Photo of Brown Pelican in care at International Bird Rescue

With Bird Rescue’s help, Brown Pelicans
get a second chance. Photo: Cheryl Reynolds

Dear Friends and Bird Allies,

To answer the question of how I helped a bird today, I must first back up to a recent Saturday when I was volunteering in the San Francisco Bay clinic.

Two adult Brown Pelicans had come into care with Domoic Acid poisoning, which can involve seizures. In order to control the seizures, the patients are heavily sedated to keep them still and quiet, almost in a comatose state. I was asked to assist the staff with the next round of IV fluids by acting as handler. I thought nothing of that when asked, as I’ve done this many times over the years.

One patient was being housed in one of the soft-sided pelagic boxes, which I thought very odd because pelicans are very tall birds and are usually housed in enclosures that accommodate their size. OK, so that was a new one on me.

When I pulled back the sheet covering the top of the box and got my first look at the patient, I had to stop for a few seconds and gather my composure. This magnificent, beautiful adult pelican was lying down in the box with its head propped up on towels, like a pillow. As I looked at the patient lying there, completely helpless and vulnerable, its state really touched my heart and paralyzed me for a few seconds. I picked up the bird, and it offered no resistance. The patient’s condition actually brought tears to my eyes.

Photo Pelicans affected Domoic Acid in treatment at International Bird Rescue


Pelicans suffering from Domoic Acid receive
a rigorous treatment and can survive.
Photo: International Bird Rescue

How did I help a bird today? By reaching inside to find the courage and strength to keep my emotions at bay as was able to lend assistance to this poor animal in need.

When I reported for my shift the following Saturday, my first question was ‘how are the pelicans doing?’ I was so happy to learn that they had recovered and were now outside in the large flight aviary getting their health and strength back.

Over the years, I have come to love and respect the animals that have come through our door for help. I’ve seen birds that have come in with broken wings, fishing line and fishing hooks tangled around legs, wings, and mouth, infected wounds, birds that have been the subject of human cruelty; and somehow, they manage to live and survive in the wild with these incredible injuries that cause more pain than I can imagine. I am constantly amazed by their resolve and determination to survive.

–Donna Callison, Volunteer, International Bird Rescue

Majestic Brown Pelicans

Bird Rescue treats on average 200+ Brown Pelicans a year. Many of these majestic birds come into our two California centers with injuries caused by humans, ranging from the unintentional fishing line entanglements to outright cruelty. All of our pelicans are released with blue bands to help track them in the wild. Since 2009, we have banded 1,200 pelicans and have received more than 800 sightings reported by citizen scientists.

Your donation helps get these beautiful birds back on their feet

 

November 26, 2015

Giving Thanks

Giving-Thanks

Dear Friends and Bird Allies,

This morning, our dedicated team in both wildlife centers are busily working to feed and care for our resident wild birds. In wildlife rehabilitation, there are no holidays! The work of cleaning pools and enclosures, medicating birds, changing bandages, and feeding these hungry patients continues 365 days a year. Our team of staff and volunteers will be headed home in the afternoon to celebrate with their families.

As 2015 approaches its end, please consider making a year-end gift to support International Bird Rescue. We depend on the generosity of wildlife lovers like you. And your contribution is tax-deductible. With your support, we have had a record year and we are now raising funds for a big year of new developments, including exciting new research into the care of seabirds and the completion of a state-of-the-art aviary for herons and egrets in our San Francisco Bay facility.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Sincerely,

JD-Bergeron_signature-web

 
 
 
 
 
 

JD Bergeron
Executive Director

Photo by Sara Silver

 

October 3, 2015

We Love Boobies!

Photos of Masked Booby and Red-Footed Booby at Bird Rescue's Los Angeles Center.

Masked Booby (left) and Red-Footed Booby at Los Angeles Center. Photos by Bill Steinkamp

What’s better than one booby?! How about two?

We have a pair of very rare boobies in care at our Los Angeles Center: a Red-footed Booby and a Masked Booby. Both of these seabird species are uncommon West Coast visitors. Red-footed Boobies can usually be found in tropical and sub-tropical waters across the globe. Masked Boobies have an enormous range that stretches from the Caribbean Islands to Australia. These unusual birds make a striking pair and we hope you enjoy the photos as much as we do.

Redondo Beach Animal Control found the Red-footed Booby last month at the Redondo Beach fishing pier. The officer observed that the bird was not moving. After transport to Bird Rescue, the booby was examined and found to be emaciated and molting with poor feather quality. It had some mild eye trauma that has since healed. (See: Patient of the Week, Sept.25, 2015)

Masked Booby was flown from Portland after being found along the coast at Newport, Oregon.

This Masked Booby was flown via Alaska Airlines from Portland, Oregon to Los Angeles after being found on the Oregon coast.

The Red-footed Booby (Sula sula) is the smallest of the booby family, standing just over two feet tall and with a wingspan over three feet.

On September 11th, a passerby captured the Masked Booby in Newport, Oregon. The bird was brought to the local Newport Field office of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Later, it was transferred to the Oregon Coast Aquarium, where Curator of Birds CJ McCarty and her team cared for it. The bird came in quite thin – weighing only 1,405g.

The USFWS contacted International Bird Rescue and requested the Masked Booby be moved to Bird Rescue in California for continued rehabilitation and release closer to its natural range. Alaska Airlines agreed to transport the booby free of charge from Portland, OR, to Los Angeles, CA this week. All of us at Bird Rescue would like to say a big thank you to USFWS, Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Coast Aquarium, and Alaska Airlines for working together to get this bird the help it needed!

On Oct 1, the bird received a full examination by our veterinarian, Rebecca Duerr DVM, and was found to be bright and alert and in general good health, having gained a substantial amount of weight while at the aquarium.

The Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra) is the largest of the booby family, standing about three feet tall and with a wingspan over five feet. According USFWS, this bird is only the second Masked Booby that has been reported north of Mendocino County, California.

Both birds are resting comfortably in the outdoor aviary at our center located in San Pedro, and are working on gaining more weight before release. When introduced to the other booby in the aviary, the Masked Booby sidled over to the Red-footed Booby along the edge of the pool and gave a big squawk of greeting to the other bird. They have been a fine pair of aviary booby buddies ever since.

You can help cover the cost of care of these birds by donating now: http://bird-rescue.org/donate

Photo of Masked and Red-footed Boobies at Bird Rescue Los Angeles

Both boobies are resting comfortably in the outdoor aviary at our center located in San Pedro, and are working on gaining more weight before release.

September 25, 2015

Patient of the Week: Red-Footed Booby

Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Rare visitor: Red-Footed Booby in care at Los Angeles Center. Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Photo of Red-Footed Booby was found at the Redondo Beach fishing pier. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

Red-Footed Booby was found at the Redondo Beach fishing pier. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

We are treating a Red-Footed Booby – a very rare visitor to Southern California – at our Los Angeles Center.

The seabird was found September 13th by Redondo Beach Animal Control on the Redondo Beach fishing pier. The officer observed that the bird was not moving.

Upon initial exam, the Booby was found to be molting with very poor feather quality. It had some mild eye trauma that has since been resolved.

The bird is doing well and it recently got moved into the aviary. The clinic staff is working on getting the bird to self feed, so, for now, it is getting supplemental nutrition​ and hydration. We will keep you updated on it’s progress.

The Red-Footed Booby (Sula sula) is among the smallest of Boobies. It’s a strong flier and will fly long distances in search of food.

This species is an uncommon west coast visitor and has been seen only rarely along the California coast. The Red-Footed Booby usually can be found in tropical and sub-tropical waters across the globe.

September 10, 2015

The Release Files: Snowy Egrets

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SNEG

Two Snowy Egrets were released back to the wild this week by IBR staff and volunteers at Ballona Wetlands in Playa del Rey, CA. One of the birds had a toe amputation and required extra care the other was a short term patient. Thanks to Doug Carter for the wonder photos.

Love Snowy Egrets? You can symbolically adopt one through our bird adoption program: http://bird-rescue.org/adopt-snowy-egret.aspx

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SNEG-release-LA3-9-2015

August 22, 2015

Patient of the Week: Black Oystercatcher (Hatchling)

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Young Black Oystercather in care at our San Francisco Bay Center. Photos by Cheryl Reynolds

We have a very special patient this week that may be the first hatchling Black Oystercatcher we’ve cared for in our 44+ years.

This orphaned Oystercatcher was captured at Natural Bridges in Santa Cruz, CA on August 7th by our friends at Native Animal Rescue (NAR). It arrived on August 9 weighing 23 grams. It has grown quickly and now weighs in at an impressive 112 grams.

The chick is in a shorebird box at our San Francisco Bay Center along with a surrogate parent (feather duster). It loves to munch on mussels and other mollusks.

Earlier this week eating mussels.

Last week Oystercatcher eating mussels.

At adulthood the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) can grow to weigh 700 grams (24 oz) with a length of 47 cm (18.5 in). These noisy seabirds are found along the rocky coastal zones from Alaska to Baja California.

There only about 12,000 Black Oystercatchers along the west coast. They are associated with healthy, productive marine habitat and thus, a great indicator species of intertidal marine health.

July 16, 2015

The Weekly Bittern

Dear supporters of International Bird Rescue,

Pelican Release in San Pedro, CA.

Pelican Release in San Pedro, CA.

Tuesday marked the end of my first week as Executive Director, and what a week it has been!

For my first few days, I had the privilege of being among the incredibly capable team at our southern facility, the Los Angeles Oiled Bird Care Center. Led by Operations Manager Julie Skoglund and Center Manager Kelly Berry, the team worked tirelessly to welcome Ian Somerhalder and our partners from Dawn dish detergent as we joined forces to celebrate our many superb volunteers, without whom none of this work with injured and orphaned birds would be possible. Thank you, IBR Volunteers and Interns, for your dedication! Please stop by and say hi when you get a chance. I’d like to meet each of you.

Two orphaned Pied-Billed Grebes are fed every half-hour and cuddle with a feather duster

Two orphaned Pied-Billed Grebes are fed every half-hour and cuddle with a feather duster.

The culmination of the event was the release of three Brown Pelicans and a Western Gull that had finished their rehabilitation and were ready for their return to the wild. I can say firsthand that this is a deeply moving experience, especially as I was given the honor of opening one of the cages. I released the Brown Pelican at the far right of the photo, who I have nicknamed N-20 for the blue band which will be used to track her progress in the future. We invite you to participate by using our citizen scientist reporting tool to document sightings of any blue banded pelican. This information is vital to our ongoing research. I’ll personally be watching closely for news of N-20, N-18, and X-01!

Over the weekend, I was able to meet the equally amazing team of our northern facility, International Bird Rescue – San Francisco Bay. Led by Center Manager Michelle Bellizzi, the northern center is currently working on a massive number of orphaned baby birds, including Green Heron, Snowy Egrets, Black-crowned Night Heron, Pied-Billed Grebes, Western Gulls, Pelagic Cormorants, Brandt’s Cormorants, Common Mergansers, and Mallards.

At both facilities, I have also had the privilege of watching our very talented Veterinarian and Research Director, Rebecca Duerr DVM MPVM PhD, as she administered pelicans, gulls, egrets, and more.

On Wednesday morning at Fort Baker, we also released a Double-Crested Cormorant and another Brown Pelican, the latter of which had been in our care for a full year after devastating damage to her wing and feathers. I’ll share more info on this bird, blue band X-01, next week.

Barbara Callahan, Director of Response Services and Interim Director for the last year, and JD Bergeron, incoming Executive Director.

Barbara Callahan, Director of Response Services and Interim Director for the last year, and JD Bergeron, incoming Executive Director.

Finally, I would be remiss if I did not send out special thanks to IBR’s Response Services Director, Barbara Callahan, who has served as Interim Director for the past year. Barbara has led the team through a challenging year and has been gracious and generous with her time and knowledge. She is now taking  much-needed rest. Thank you, Barbara!

There are many ways to support IBR:

adopt a bird

become a recurring donor

join as a Pelican Partner

volunteer

Please also follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flicker, and YouTube

I love to hear from you so please get in touch!

Be well,

JD-Bergeron_signature-web

 

 

 

JD Bergeron
Executive Director

 

July 7, 2015

Patient of the Week: Mallard With Scalp Laceration And Other Injuries

Mallard right after waking up from scalp surgery.

Female Mallard when she arrived at WildCare with a scalp laceration exposing her skull. Photo by Nat Smith

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Mallard right after waking up from scalp surgery.

This female Mallard was transferred to us from our colleagues at WildCare in San Rafael, CA. When she arrived, she had several serious problems: a scalping injury at the base of the upper bill (consistent with being struck by a vehicle), a swollen leg with an infected tendon from a small puncture wound, and a broken wing (ulna).

Her scalp healed flawlessly and you can already see tiny feathers starting to regrow! Her foot infection was successfully treated and we are just waiting for final recovery from the wing fracture before being able to release this resilient bird.

As reported by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, California’s Mallard population has declined 27% since 2014, following other declines in recent years.

Read more: How waterfowl species in California are faring during the drought.

– Rebecca Duerr, Staff Veterinarian, International Bird Rescue

Photo: Mallard Duck with her skin totally healed and feathers coming in.

Now with her skin totally healed and feathers coming back in. Photos by Rebecca Duerr – International Bird Rescue

June 29, 2015

The Release Files: Black Rail

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A Black Rail is back again where it belongs – hiding in nature.

Staff from our San Francisco Bay Center released the hatchling year Black Rail after came to us via WildCare after being rescued in Novato. It arrived on May 25, 2015 weighing 11 grams. It found with a small wound on its left elbow.

It more than doubled its weight to 24 grams before being released on June 26th at Black Point in Novato, CA.

Black Rails are super secretive as it walks or runs through shallow salt and freshwater marshes. It is rarely seen in flight. It’s the smallest of all Rails.

Watch the short release video  > >

April 28, 2015

Influx of Black-crowned Night Herons

Black Crowned Night Heron in care at our Los Angeles Center. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

Black Crowned Night Herons in care at our Los Angeles Center. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

Black Crowned Night Herons in care at our Los Angeles Center. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

This is baby bird season and at each of our two California centers we’re beginning to see an influx of young aquatic birds – especially Black-crowned Night Herons.

A handful of these sharp-beaked birds are in care at our Los Angeles Center after being found at two separate rookeries in Marina del Rey and in Long Beach.

All are doing great, self feeding and being given supplemental vitamins. They will likely move outside this week.

We currently have 38 Black-crowned Night Herons in care between both California centers, as well as a host of other sick, injured and orphaned birds that need your support! You can donate to help with their ongoing care here.

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April 22, 2015

Happy Earth Day: #HowDoYouLoveWildlife by Dawn

Our friends and partners at Dawn have come up with another terrific web video. This one captures the heart and soul of one of our long-time volunteers, Deborah Heritage, working with wildlife at our San Francisco Bay Center.

Volunteer Deborah Heritage releases a Grebe.

Volunteer Deborah Heritage releases a Horned Grebe.

Deborah speaks about becoming an empty nest parent. She began as a volunteer in 2008 at International Bird Rescue.

“Maybe I’m just the kind of person who just wants to keep taking care of something – and the birds came into my life,” says Deborah. “My nest is full of birds right now!”

Bird Rescue, the earth and the birds are so lucky to have dedicated volunteers like Deborah. #HowDoYouLoveWildlife

Happy Earth Day from all of us!

P.S. – Andie Perez, a volunteer at our Los Angles Center, is also featured in a Dawn video. The Environmental Science major at Cal State University, Long Beach, gets hands-on experience working with wildlife. See the video

Andie Perez, a volunteer at our Los Angeles Center is also featured in a Dawn video.

Andie Perez, a volunteer at our Los Angeles Center is also featured in a Dawn video.

April 9, 2015

Your Donation Goes Twice As Far…

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Dear fellow bird lover,

After helping raise 1,400 baby birds last year, THIS spring is clearly going to be another busy season!

Last week we received a “Duckling Dozen” rescued by a California Highway Patrol officer and our friends at Solano County Animal Services. These 12 ducklings were rescued from the freeway after the mother duck lost her life. After closing the freeway, rescuers scooped the frightened birds up and quickly brought them to our San Francisco Bay Center.

Three goslings are some of the other baby birds in care this month at IBR. Photos by Cheryl Reynolds

Three goslings in care this month at our San Francisco Bay Center. (Top) Lots of orphaned Mallard ducklings, including these rescued from a local freeway.  Photos by Cheryl Reynolds

This is where we ask you to help support these precious lives.

Become a member now during our Spring Membership Drive and a generous donor will match your contribution up to $10,000! Just think, we can double your donation to support the birds!

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We want to encourage monthly donors too, so we have special offer provided by ALEX AND ANI and their philanthropic division, CHARITY BY DESIGN. Supporters who become monthly donors will receive the ALEX AND ANI ‘Sacred Dove’ charm bangle, a beautiful piece from the ALEX AND ANI collection. It’s a wonderful way to show your support for the birds that inspire all of us every day. And you’ll be an official member of our Seabird Circle. Your pledge of $15 a month or more as a sustaining member makes it all possible.

With encroaching development squeezing out the available habitat for wildlife and changes in our climate, our patient-load continues to grow. Your support is needed more than ever to help us get through what we know will be a season full of animals in need – they need our lifesaving support to help them through being orphaned, entangled in fishing line, sick or injured.

Won’t you please join our Spring Campaign and help us meet our goal of raising $20,000 and help us help the thousands of wild birds that will need our help this year?

Thank you again for your unwavering and generous support,

Barbara Signature

 

 

 

Barbara Callahan
Interim Executive Director