Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Animal Cruelty

November 7, 2014

Update: Reward in Great Blue Heron shooting now $6K+

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Photo by Cheryl Reynolds

logosEarlier this week, we blogged about this Great Blue Heron, brought to our San Francisco Bay center last weekend with gunshot wounds a wing fracture. This animal was rescued in Hollister, CA by our friends at Wildlife Emergency Services, which secured an initial $5,050 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for this crime.

We’re pleased to report that the Animal Legal Defense Fund has now added an additional $1,000 to the reward, along with $200 from an ALDF supporter. The reward now stands at $6,250.

Great Blue Herons are federally protected birds under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) currently is seeking information on this federal crime, which is punishable by a fine of up to $15,000 and a jail sentence of up to six months. Anonymous tipsters can call the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s CalTip line at 888-334-2258 or the USFWS at 650-876-9078.

Wildlife Emergency Services has created a bilingual flyer for this reward, shown below.

heron reward sign

November 4, 2014

Patients of the week: two Great Blue Herons, two human-caused injuries seen all too often

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Photos by Cheryl Reynolds

Great Blue Herons are among the most majestic of aquatic birds, with their S-curved necks in flight, graceful stature andGHBE lightning-quick reflexes as they hunt for prey at water’s edge.

Though this species has been protected by federal law for nearly a century, our wildlife teams regularly care for herons injured by human causes — some incidental, others deliberate. Today, International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay center is caring for herons affected by both.

The Great Blue Heron you see above was rescued by our friends at Wildlife Emergency Services after it was found crouched in the backyard of a Hollister, CA home. Caregivers at SPCA for Monterey County Wildlife Center took X-rays of the heron and found that it had been shot. The bird has since been transferred to us, and is recovering from a fractured wing in addition to the gunshot wounds.

Wildlife Emergency Services has secured a reward of $5,050 in this case; anonymous tipsters with information leading to the arrest and conviction IMG_1375-Lof the person or persons responsible can call the California Department of Fish and Wildlife CalTip line at 888-334-2258 or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at 650-876-9078.

Great Blue Herons are known to sometimes hunt for fish in backyard ponds. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology offers a simple solution for homeowners and their koi fish: Put a length of drain pipe in the pond for the fish to hide from wading birds seeking a quick meal.

Our second Great Blue Heron (right) at International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay center has a more common affliction: injuries due to fishing line entanglement. Both of these birds are being housed in outdoor heron aviaries with privacy screening to limit visual contact (Great Blues can be high-stress birds in captivity).

Your support as a member is what makes this work possible. Thank you very much!

June 18, 2014

In care: Brown Pelican with an odd injury

Lead poisoned BRPE
Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Often we receive birds with inexplicable injuries. This is one such case.

Animal control officers recently transported a Brown Pelican with an injured foot to our Los Angeles center. Our veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, found and removed two sharp, wood objects that had impeded the bird’s ability to bear weight on its foot.

And that was just the beginning. Dr. Duerr then found a fishing hook embedded in the back of the bird’s throat requiring surgery to retrieve. During surgery, more hook fragments were found in the pelican’s stomach, all of which also were removed.

And here’s the mystery injury: The x-ray you see here shows a large metal object embedded in the pelican’s synsacrum, or pelvis. It was lodged deep in a hole adjacent to the spinal cord, completely surrounded by bone. Dr. Duerr initially assumed this metal object was a bullet of some kind, but upon cleaning it off after surgery, noted that it looked more like a fishing sinker.

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Sinker

If that’s the case, how would a 12 millimeter-long fishing sinker get embedded in the pelvis of a pelican? Speculation so far has settled on a high powered slingshot or some sort of homemade ammunition. Tests came back positive for lead toxicity, for which this bird is currently undergoing treatment.

Pelicans with fishing line or tackle-related injuries continue to flood our centers this summer. Monofilament line can create horrible constriction wounds and hooks may penetrate joints or other crucial anatomic areas. If you see fishing line or hooks in the environment, you can do the birds and other animals a huge favor by carefully picking it up and disposing of it properly.

This likely cruelty case comes about two months after the Pink the Pelican story.

June 4, 2014

Release! Pink the Pelican


L.A. City Councilman Joe Buscaino releases Pink. Photos and video by Bill Steinkamp and Kira Perov (volume adjustment on lower right of video control panel)

Pink, a California Brown Pelican and now arguably one of the most famous patients in International Bird Rescue history, was successfully released on Tuesday afternoon at White Point Park in San Pedro, CA, by L.A. City Councilman Joe Buscaino, assisted by a lovely young girl excited to see the bird off on its next adventures.

As you may have read, less than seven weeks ago this animal was brought to our Los Angeles center with its throat pouch nearly severed off its bill. A human-caused injury, the incident sparked outrage among animal lovers in Southern California and beyond. A $20,000 reward is still being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for this illegal act. Tips may be made anonymous to US Fish and Wildlife Service at 310-328-1516.

Thank you to everyone who helped support the care of this bird, including the Port of Long Beach, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, the Ian Somerhalder Foundation, Terranea Resort and countless bird lovers in Los Angeles and elsewhere in the country.

After two surgeries and weeks in care, this pelican made a record recovery and was very eager for release from our large pelican aviary. As part of our Blue-Banded Pelican Program, we banded Pink with a blue band reading V70. If you see Pink out along the Pacific Coast, you can report your sighting here.

Releases are always powerful experiences that cut through the madness of modern life. International Bird Rescue’s “Every Bird Matters” mantra was definitely the theme of the day. Photographer Bill Steinkamp was on hand to take some wonderful photos of the event. Enjoy!

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May 31, 2014

Pink the Pelican scheduled for release

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Photos by Bill Steinkamp

Good news!

“Pink,” a California Brown Pelican who made national headlines after being found with a near-severed throat pouch caused by an unknown assailant, has made a truly remarkable recovery at International Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles center and is scheduled for a June 3 release. Here’s the scheduled release information for this public event:

When: Tuesday, June 3 at 12:30 P.M.

Where: White Point Park in San Pedro CA. Address: Kay Fiorentino Drive, San Pedro, CA 90731 (see map below).

Nicknamed for the color of the bird’s temporary leg band worn while in care at IBR, Pink was found with a mutilated pouch over six weeks ago by Long Beach Animal Control officers. Unable to feed, the bird was extremely thin, anemic and could not fly when brought to IBR.

“Despite the vicious attack against this pelican, Pink brought out the best in wildlife lovers all over the country, who supported and rallied behind the bird’s care and recovery,” said IBR executive director Jay Holcomb. “Though we still don’t know who committed this criminal act, we’re thrilled to release a strong and healthy Pink, one of hundreds of pelicans we care for every year.”

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Pink the Pelican, prior to surgery to repair a slashed pouch

During the past year, pelican pouch slashings perpetrated by humans have been seen in California, Florida and North Carolina. Pink’s pouch laceration required hundreds of stitches during two operations lasting a total of six hours.

“Over the course of treatment, I’ve seen Pink transform from weak and sad to feisty and voracious,” said IBR staff veterinarian Dr. Rebecca Duerr, who has performed nearly 100 pelican pouch surgeries in her career. “Despite having the largest pouch laceration I’ve ever seen, he did great during post-operative care and has healed in record time.”

IBR is extremely grateful for support from the Port of Long Beach for Pink, whose care was also aided by donations from the Ian Somerhalder Foundation, Terranea Resort and bird lovers in Southern California and beyond. The Animal Legal Defense Fund assisted IBR with communicating this animal cruelty story to the public.

Release-Map

Pink’s recovery was made possible by IBR animal care staff, who performed regular exams on the bird and provided extensive rehabilitative and supportive care.

 

May 27, 2014

“Pink” shows off a gorgeous pouch

nk 051614revPink (foreground) shows off a mended pouch alongside a fellow pelican. Photo by Dave Weeshoff

Thanks to the work of our amazing veterinarian and rehabilitation staff, Pink the Pelican’s once-slashed throat pouch is but a distant memory. This adult California Brown Pelican is doing extremely well, and we look forward to releasing Pink soon! Stay tuned.

May 14, 2014

Pink’s pouch progress: Remarkable healing now underway!

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Photos by Dr. Rebecca Duerr

With their fossil record existence dating back at least 30 million years, Brown Pelicans are strong and resilient animals. For proof, look no further than to the story BRPEof “Pink.”

As you may have read, our Los Angeles center received an adult California Brown Pelican, now nicknamed Pink, in mid-April with a severe pouch laceration consistent with a human-caused injury. A $20,000 reward remains on the table for anyone with information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for this illegal act (tips can be given to U.S. Fish & Wildlife at 310-238-1416).

Brown Pelicans depend on their throat pouches to catch fish. But those spectacular plunge-diving displays were impossible for Pink, who came to us cold, anemic, extremely thin and too weak to fly. Temporary surgical skin staples were placed to hold the pouch together so that Pink could eat.

After a week in the care of our wildlife rehabilitation team, Pink gained enough strength to withstand the lengthy surgeries needed to repair this wound.

Assisted by center staff, International Bird Rescue staff veterinarian Dr. Rebecca Duerr performed two surgeries on Pink, each lasting three hours and requiring hundreds of sutures.

Which brings us to the good news: The sutures have been removed, and we’re pleased to report that both sides of the pouch are healing remarkably well, and no further surgery is needed.

“Barring complications,” Dr. Duerr notes, “I’d like the bird to stay happily eating in the aviary for a little while longer in order for the newly repaired skin to mature and strengthen before it has to hit the ocean at high speed in a plunge dive. So far, so good.”

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May 9, 2014

Director’s note on the Oakland heron incident

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Friends,

We appreciate all the support of the community over the past several days regarding the incident at a heron rookery in Oakland, CA, and we understand the outrage that many are feeling.

International Bird Rescue (IBR) wants everyone to know that the proprietor of the tree-trimming business has committed to funding the care of the five chicks that were rescued from that location — one of which required surgery by our veterinarian to repair a fractured mandible. The investigation in this case will be handled by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which has jurisdiction over migratory bird issues.

Since this story broke, we’ve seen reports in the media that the tree-trimming business proprietor and his family have been the targets of severe harassment. I want to make it clear that we at IBR strongly condemn any harassment or threats against this individual and his family. We ask that all concerned citizens allow this case to be handled by the authorities and refrain from any retaliatory behavior.

In the meantime, we are directing all our energy into the care and treatment of these wonderful animals. IBR will continue to post updates on the birds and this case as it progresses. You can watch some of these birds on our live BirdCam.

How can you help? These five birds are just a fraction of the total baby birds in care at our wildlife centers. You can support this lifesaving care here.

Thank you,

Jay Holcomb-Signature

Jay Holcomb
Director

May 1, 2014

“Pink” on the slow road to recovery after second surgery completed; reward doubled to $20K

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Photo by Bill Steinkamp

As the story of “Pink” the mutilated California Brown Pelican continues to touch animal lovers across the country, an anonymous Southern California donor has doubled the reward money to $20,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the vicious attack on this protected bird.

The additional reward money comes as the Port of Long Beach announced Thursday that it will give $5,000 towards the surgical and rehabilitative care of Pink, an adult bird captured by Long Beach Animal Care Services on April 16 with the pouch severed from the animal’s bill. The extent and nature of the wound is consistent with a human-caused injury with an unidentified sharp object.

“The Port of Long Beach has made great strides in recent years in improving the harbor environment both for people and wildlife, polb_h_4cand we’re happy to be able to support the rehabilitation of Pink the Pelican,” said Al Moro, Acting Executive Director of the Port of Long Beach. “We’re looking forward to seeing Pink back in the skies over the harbor very soon.”

Over the past five days, Pink has undergone two surgeries — one on Sunday, the other on Tuesday — by International Bird Rescue staff veterinarian Dr. Rebecca Duerr. The pelican was under anesthesia for a total of six hours as Dr. Duerr completed hundreds of stitches to repair the injury.

“Enough is enough,” said Jay Holcomb, Executive Director of International Bird Rescue. “Far too often, we see victims of senseless cruelty at the hands of people who are never punished. We are thankful for the support of an anonymous donor to bring further attention to this horrifying case, and grateful for the Port of Long Beach’s support of Pink’s long-term care.”

Upon capture over two weeks ago at the 5400 block of Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach, Pink was extremely anemic, likely from blood loss. By the first surgery, the bird was back up to near a normal red blood cell count, important for any animal undergoing lengthy surgeries. The pelican is currently being cared for in an indoor enclosure and is under the expert care of International Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles center team.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is seeking information on this federal crime, which is punishable by a fine of up to $15,000 and a jail sentence of up to six months. Anyone with information that might lead to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the mutilation of this bird should contact USFWS at 310-328-1516. Tips may be given anonymously.Slashed-pelican-fund

The $20,000 reward is also supported by the Animal Legal Defense Fund, Lourdes Rivas & Patti Ballaz of Los Angeles, as well as several concerned citizens in the Los Angeles area who wish to remain anonymous

International Bird Rescue depends on the support of the public to care for animals injured in cruelty incidents, as well as those harmed by fishing gear wounds and other human-caused injuries. To make a donation, please click on the image to the right.

Update: Dr. Rebecca Duerr took this photo of Pink following the second operation, which lasted about three hours.

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April 28, 2014

An update on “Pink” the pelican

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Dr. Rebecca Duerr with “Pink” during the animal’s first surgery, photos by Bill Steinkamp.

After a week filled with heartbreaking images of our latest animal cruelty patient, we’re pleased to give you some good news today: BRPE

The adult California Brown Pelican mutilated by an unknown suspect has completed a successful first surgery to repair an extensive pouch laceration, one consistent with human-caused injury.

Click here for the backstory on this bird, nicknamed “Pink” for the colored leg band we assigned the animal upon arrival at our Los Angeles center.

On Sunday afternoon, IBR veterinarian Dr. Rebecca Duerr performed the three-hour procedure assisted by Los Angeles center rehabilitation staff. We are hopeful for this bird’s recovery, though multiple surgeries and extensive rehabilitative care are needed.

Another bit of good news: the Animal Legal Defense Fund announced today that it has doubled its commitment to a reward in this case, which now totals $10,000 and includes the support of concerned citizens in the Los Angeles area.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) currently is seeking information on this federal crime, which is punishable by a fine of up to $15,000 and a jail sentence of up to six months. Anyone with information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the mutilation of this bird should contact USFWS at 310-328-1516. Tips may be given anonymously.

“In my 40-plus years as a wildlife rehabilitator, I’ve seen too many of these horrible attacks against innocent animals,” said Slashed-pelican-fundInternational Bird Rescue executive director Jay Holcomb. “The public is sick of it too, and we hear their frustration. We as a society cannot and should not tolerate these crimes any longer.”

IBR depends on the support of the public to care for animals injured in cruelty incidents, as well as those harmed by fishing wound and other human-caused injuries. To make a donation, please click on the “Slashed Pelican Fund” image to the right. Thank you so much.

Previous coverage:

“Pink” the pelican, animal cruelty victim

Reward offered: Brown Pelican with severe laceration, suspect sought

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April 26, 2014

“Pink” the Pelican, animal cruelty victim

Pink the Pelican in care at IBR photo

We don’t typically name our patients, but the nickname “Pink” stuck.

Dear Friends,

“Man, that’s so sad. Good luck, little Pink.”

That’s what we overheard a TV news cameraman say on Wednesday while filming a victim of animal cruelty, now recuperating in the aviary at International Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles center. You may have seen stories about this adult Brown Pelican on the news in the past few days. Here’s a recent photo of the bird, shown with a pink plastic leg band.

Though we don’t typically name our patients, the nickname “Pink” has stuck. And you can help Pink get a second chance.

A few days ago, Pink was found in Long Beach, CA with a severe pouch laceration leaving the bird unable to feed. Sadly, the wound is consistent with human-caused injury. It’s the worst deliberate pouch slashing we’ve ever seen.

We’re pleased to let you know that Pink has been able to feed on plenty of sardines over the past few days, thanks to the temporary staples placed in the animal’s pouch wound. On Sunday, our veterinarian will perform the first of what could be multiple surgeries.

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“Pink” may need multiple surgeries to repair a slashed pouch.

When you give to support Pink, you’re not only giving this beautiful pelican a second chance. You’re also helping to support the 200-600 pelicans our L.A. wildlife center cares for each year: oiled, injured and even abused by humans.

We don’t know why someone would do this, but we encourage anyone with information on this attack to call US Fish and Wildlife at 310-328-1516. A $7,500 reward is currently being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for this crime. Tips may be given anonymously.

Thank you for your support.

In gratitude,

Team International Bird Rescue

Slashed-pelican-fundP.S. – Please visit birdrescue.org for regular updates on Pink in the coming weeks.

April 19, 2014

Reward offered: Brown Pelican with severe pouch laceration, suspect sought

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Update, May 1: An anonymous supporter, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, along with the generous support of individual donors including Lourdes Rivas & Patti Ballaz, have increased the reward to $20,000 for information leading to the arrest of those responsible for this horrific pelican attack. 

Anyone with information that might lead to the arrest and conviction of the suspect or suspects should contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) at 310-328-1516.

Slashed-pelican-fundYou can make a donation to support the care of this animal by clicking on the pelican image to the right. Mail-in donations can be sent to:

International Bird Rescue
P.O. Box 2171
Long Beach CA 90801

You can also make a donation by phone. Simply call us at 510-289-1472 and we’ll handle your gift right away.

This Brown Pelican with a severe pouch laceration injury was found and captured last week at 5400 Ocean Blvd in Long Beach before transfer to our Los Angeles center. The laceration runs all the way around the pouch, and as a result the pelican was unable to self-feed.

Our center team has placed temporary staples in the pouch to allow the bird to self-feed and stabilize. The bird is currently living in our small aviary awaiting surgery to repair the pouch.

Jay Holcomb, the rescue organization’s director, said fishermen sometimes injure birds because they are falsely seen as competition.

“Pelicans are of no threat to anyone, yet they continue to be mutilated and even killed by people who see them as competition for fish,” Holcomb said in a statement. “The truth is a pelican’s diet is mostly anchovies and sardines – fish that are used as bait by people who fish for sport.”

Reward offered for arrest of pelican abuser, Orange County Register, April 21, 2014

Anyone with information that might lead to the arrest and conviction of person responsible for the mutilation of this bird should contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) at 310-328-1516. We’ll keep you posted on this bird’s condition.

Read the full press release on this incident here.

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Further reading:

Blue-Banded Pelican Project

November 2, 2013

Update on Elegant Tern cruelty case

Release day for Elegant Tern 13-2408 at SF Bay Center
Elegant Tern photos by Cheryl ReynoldsELTE

The Elegant Tern brought to International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay center last month with a gunshot wound is now flying well and on track for release, our staff reports.

“We are amazed that this bird has recovered so well after sustaining such a traumatic injury to its wing,” says Isabel Luevano, an International Bird Rescue rehabilitation technician.

“During the course of this tern’s care, we did notice that the bird was having waterproofing issues, which correlate with the bird’s entry wound at its shoulder. After two quick washes, we believe the bird is getting closer to release, and appears to be regaining its waterproofing back quickly,” Luevano says.

Anyone with information on the perpetrator or perpetrators behind this animal cruelty case should call U.S. Fish and Wildlife Law Enforcement Offices in Burlingame, Calif. at (650) 876-9078. Elegant Terns are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Read the original post on this case here, as well as an article in the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

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October 10, 2013

Cruelty case: Terns are not for target practice

Elegant Tern 13-2408 in care at SF Bay Center, pellet in shoulder
Elegant Tern recovering from gunshot injury, photo by Cheryl Reynolds

Update: The Santa Cruz Sentinel has covered this cruelty incident, read the article here.

With a slender, downturned bill, a black crown during breeding season and a graceful wing shape in flight, it’s easy to see where the Elegant Tern got its name.

Unfortunately, the tern you see here was the target of very inelegant human cruelty, and now has a bullet lodged in its right shoulder.

Earlier this week, our San Francisco Bay center received into care this Elegant Tern, found injured on a beach in Santa Cruz, Calif. Xray1X-rays confirmed the presence of the bullet, shown here. These animals are considered a near-threatened species for their highly restricted breeding distribution: More than 90% of all Elegant Terns nest on the small island of Isla Rasa off the coast of Mexico’s Baja California.

But we are pleased to report that as of this post, the bird is doing well in care. And International Bird Rescue’s centers have deep experience in caring for terns such as this one. For instance, in 2006 we raised many young tern survivors after dozens of nests were deliberately washed off a barge docked in Long Beach, Calif. To give these birds the best chance of survival, we released them at a tern colony in the Salton Sea, where they would be surrounded by other young birds learning to fish.

International Bird Rescue Members help us make this work possible, whether it’s carrying for bird victims of cruelty incidents or other injury types. If you’ve given in our fall membership drive, thank you so much. If you haven’t yet, please consider joining us – we’re closing in on our $30,000 pledge goal and need your support. Any gift of $25 or more makes you a member.

Anyone with information on the perpetrator or perpetrators behind this animal cruelty case should call U.S. Fish and Wildlife Law Enforcement Offices in Burlingame, Calif. at (650) 876-9078. Elegant Terns are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Elegant Tern 13-2408 in care at SF Bay Center, pellet in shoulder

Meanwhile, our San Francisco Bay center is filling up with many other interesting seabirds in need of expert care, including this Surf Scoter (shown below), treated for a scalp injury of undetermined cause. You can see his recovery live on our BirdCam, along with several murres and grebes sharing his pool.

Surf Scoter 13-2400 in care at SF Bay Center
Surf Scoter, photo by Cheryl Reynolds

Basic-Membership 3  Sustaining-Members

More cruelty case coverage from 2013:

An update on arrowed goose’s recovery

More than a year after cruel attack, Brown Pelican soars high again

Birds getting caught in Marina del Rey tree nets

Santa Cruz Sentinel: Information sought after federally protected bird shot in Capitola (Oct. 10, 2013)

April 11, 2013

An update on arrowed goose’s recovery

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We’re pleased to report that the Greylag Goose recently brought to International Bird Rescue’s San Francisco Bay center with an arrow wound through its neck is doing well.

Center Manager Michelle Bellizzi informs us that the goose has “graduated to a water-based aviary in preparation for his/her placement/return to Napa Wildlife,” the organization that had captured the bird and brought it to us for surgery and care (read more on this bird’s treatment and surgery by Dr. Rebecca Duerr here).

According to local reports, an individual has stepped forward in this incident. Via Napa Valley Register, which was a key media source in solving this case:

A 14-year-old boy who lives along the Napa River admitted shooting a Graylag goose in the neck with an arrow in late March, Napa County Sheriff’s Capt. Tracey Stuart said Wednesday.

The boy said he meant to shoot the rubber-tipped practice arrow into the ground to shoo a gaggle of geese away from the family’s yard, she said.

[...]

“The young man was visibly upset, very remorseful about hurting the goose and has no history of similar behavior,” Stuart said.

The case was discussed with a prosecutor from the Napa County District Attorney’s Office, Stuart said. “It is likely that the young man will be devoting many hours to community service, helping and learning about animals,” she said.

Read the full article here.

Unfortunately, cases like this one are rarely solved. According to The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS):

—Wildlife officials estimate that nationwide, tens of millions of animals are killed illegally each year.

—It is estimated that only 1 percent to 5 percent of poached animals come to the attention of law enforcement.

In California, animal cruelty is a felony and police take animal cruelty cases seriously. With the goose and arrow as evidence, the Napa Police began a criminal investigation and the HSUS put up a reward of $5,000 for evidence leading to arrest (null in this case, as the offender turned himself in).

Many individuals and organizations came together to help this goose, including:photo-1

—Kerana Todorov, crime reporter at the Napa Valley Register (follow her on Twitter @NVRkerana)

—Michelle Anderson at Wildlife Rescue Center of Napa County and her rescue team

—Jennifer Fearing at HSUS (@JenniferFearing)

—Nick Janes, reporter at CBS 13 Sacramento (@nick_janes)

—Sargent Oscar Ortiz, Napa Police Animal Services

—Rebecca Duerr, DVM MPVM at International Bird Rescue

—Our volunteers and staff who have cared for this beautiful Greylag Goose, now looking for a safe and proper home! Karen Benzel