Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

January 1, 2019

2018 By the Numbers

Species Treated: 97

2018 was a great year for expanding our knowledge surrounding some of our less common patients. Between our two California wildlife centers, Bird Rescue cared for 97 different species of aquatic birds! Some of our unique species this year include: Belted Kingfisher, Long-tailed Duck, Pelagic Cormorant, Black-vented Shearwater, Rhinoceros Auklet and both Brown and Red-footed Booby.

Washing Birds: 100

Even in the absence of a major oil spill, our staff and volunteers still wash birds throughout the year. Some of these birds arrive oiled from the natural seep off of the coast of Ventura, others come in contaminated by other substances such as vegetable or motor oil. In 2018 we washed over 100 birds ranging from Great Horned Owls to Brown Pelicans. Working with these cases of individual oiled birds allows us to improve our skills and training so that our team remains ready to respond in the event that a spill does occur.

Total Birds: 3,000+

Between our SF Bay-Delta wildlife center in Fairfield and our L.A. wildlife center in San Pedro, we cared for over 3,000 patients in 2018. While we do care for a broad range of species, there are some types of birds that come into our care most frequently as a result of various forms of urban/wildlife conflict. Orphaned ducks, geese, herons, and egrets flood our centers during the baby bird season when their nests have been disturbed, or when they have been separated from their parents. Gulls, pelicans, and cormorants are some of the birds we see most frequently injured due to fishing line entanglement or hook ingestion. Grebes come into care almost daily during the winter months that have become oiled due to natural seep on their journey south for the winter.

Volunteer Hours: 20,000+

Our team of dedicated volunteers are what make this work possible. Together they put in over 20,000 hours of work over the course of 2018. From bird care, feeding and cleaning to education, outreach and administrative assistance, our volunteers do it all with smiles on their faces. Thank you so much to each and every person who volunteers their time and efforts to help rescue waterbirds in crisis! If you would like to volunteer at either of our California wildlife centers, you can learn more and apply HERE.

Birds Released: 1267

Our favorite number from this year: 1267. That is the number of birds successfully released or transferred in 2018. This is the reason we do the work that we do. There is nothing quite like watching a wild bird return to its natural home in good health and full strength. We hope that these moments and images inspire you to take action every day to protect the natural home of wildlife and ourselves.

 

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