Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

December 18, 2017

Great Egret Suffers Two Gunshot Wounds, $500 Reward Offered

Wounded Great Egret is recovering at Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles Wildlife Center. Photo: Devin Hansen/International Bird Rescue

A Great Egret is recovering at International Bird Rescue after being found shot in Southern California on November 28, 2017. International Bird Rescue is offering a $500 reward to anyone with information leading to the conviction of the perpetrator involved.

The wounded Egret was brought to an Agoura Hills, CA animal hospital before being transferred to Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles Wildlife Center with two gunshot wounds. One pellet went in at the left breast muscle, punched a hole in the bird’s keel, exited on the right side and fractured the bird’s wing bone (ulna).

“Bird Rescue was created to mitigate human impact on birds, and most of the injuries we see on a daily basis are caused by human negligence,” said JD Bergeron, International Bird Rescue Executive Director. “A bird like this though–a beautiful white marsh bird that was used for target practice–is the victim of willful human cruelty.”

The injured bird, nicknamed “Ernie” by the students at Colina Middle School in Thousand Oaks where the animal was found, underwent a successful surgery and is recuperating at Bird Rescue’s wildlife center located in San Pedro, CA. Read: Injured egret saved on middle school campus

“To the exceptional students and staff at Colina Middle School: Thank you for coming to the aid of this bird in distress,” said Bergeron.

The abuse of this Great Egret is a federal offense. Anyone with information about this animal cruelty case, including the name or location of the perpetrator, can call the local U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement at (310) 328-1516. Callers may remain anonymous.

“We hope that whoever is responsible for this shooting can be brought to justice,” added Bergeron.

Great Egrets were nearly hunted to extinction in the 1890’s for their silky plume of feathers. Concerned citizens organized a nationwide movement that resulted in federal protection for migratory birds under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.

 

X-ray of fractured the bird’s wing bone (ulna).

Pellet removed from Great Egret by our vet during surgery.

Egret just after surgery.

 

 

Leave a Reply