Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Archive for July 2017

July 15, 2017

Photo of the Week: Baby Green Herons

Just when we thought baby season was starting to slow down, these three orphaned Green Heron chicks came into care this week because of human kindness. After the mother heron was struck by a car near Glendale, CA, a Good Samaritan scooped up the brood and delivered them to our Los Angeles wildlife center.

The siblings are self-feeding, which is a sign they are doing well in care. Over the course of 25 days, they will fledge (learn to fly) and they will be released to the wild. Check out this video of this energetic threesome.

To spot a Green Heron in the wild, visit a coastal or inland wetland and carefully scan the banks looking for a small, hunchbacked bird with a long, straight bill. They are quite shy and will fly away if approached too closely. One fascinating fact: Green Herons are a species that are known to use tools. During feeding, they are known to drop small items on the water’s surface to entice small fish, making them true fisher-birds! You can see this behavior on YouTube.

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Photo by staffer Kylie Clatterbuck

 

July 1, 2017

Photo of the Week: Oiled Great Egret is clean again


This week, a contaminated Great Egret arrived at our Los Angeles wildlife center. Rescued in Huntington Beach, CA, it was covered over 100% of its body with an unidentified contaminant resembling lubricant. These birds are usually a pure white, but this egret came into care with matted yellow feathers (upper left photo).

Thanks to our rehabilitation team, the bird was stabilized with fluids and rest. Then it was washed using our 46 years of time-tested methods and DAWN dishwashing liquid.

We’re happy to report that this cleaned bird (upper right photo) is healthy and eating well. It will be returned the wild as soon as it puts on some weight and proves to have no infections.

Great Egrets are large birds – about twice the size of a Snowy Egret – and can be distinguished from other white egrets by its yellow bill and black legs and feet. Learn more from our friends at Cornell Lab or Ornithology: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Egret/id

Photos by Kylie Clatterbuck and Devin Hanson