Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Archive for May 2017

May 28, 2017

Baby American Coot Helping Feed Younger Coot

After 46 years, it sometimes feels like we have seen it all… but our patients can still bring surprises! American Coot chicks are perhaps some of the oddest babies we get at Bird Rescue. They start out with fire-engine red and yellow head feathers and grow into a relatively drab, dark gray with black heads and white beaks.

Hungry American Coot chick.

These American Coot chicks came in at different times, as can be seen by their size difference. With a little luck, we are able to match orphans of the same species. None of this is unusual.

What is unusual is that whenever we add food to their enclosure, the larger baby coot takes it upon itself to FEED the younger one! Click the video above to see an adorable video clip.

Coots are in the shorebird family Rallidae, along with Gallinules and Rails, and develop into plump chicken-like birds that spend most of their lives on the water. They have remarkable greenish legs and large feet. Learn more: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Coot/id

Photos by Cheryl Reynolds

 

 

May 20, 2017

Photo of the Week: Caspian Tern With Fishhook In Wing

Check out this beautiful Caspian Tern, photographed by Alex Viduetsky from the oceanic jetty in Playa Del Rey, California.

Now look closer and you’ll see what Alex also saw: “Unexpectedly, a Caspian Tern with a fishhook in its right wing flew above my head. It made me think how many birds are getting hooked and how many of them are capable of breaking free?”

The answer is that we see many, many birds that have been hooked or entangled, and next to none of them are capable of unhooking themselves. Many hooks are ingested.

Fishing line and fish hooks are the single most frequent problem we treat at Bird Rescue. Please help by picking up fishing debris wherever you see it!

 

May 11, 2017

For Mother’s Day: Adopt a Duckling!

Everybody needs a Mom! These orphaned Ducklings are a reminder that Mother’s Day (May 14th) is just a around the corner. What better way to celebrate than with a bird adoption.

Adopt a bird in your Mom’s name and download a customizable PDF adoption certificate. With a $125 donation you can adopt a clutch of Ducklings. For as little as $25, you can symbolically adopt a single Duckling!

Each spring hundreds of ducklings stream into our California centers in search of a meal, a warm home and some TLC. In care this week we have 167 Dabbling Ducks and ducklings. You can help. Support their care and make Mom proud, too.

 

May 9, 2017

Patient of the Week: Black-crowned Night-Heron

Oh, how this baby has grown! When this Black-crowned Night-Heron came to us after being rescued from a downtown Oakland rookery in mid-April it weighed just 45 grams (shown at right) and looked like it might not make it another day.

Black-crowned Night-Heron chick arrived at 45 grams and looked like it might not make it another day. It now weighs more than 500 grams (top). Photos by Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

Thanks to a strong will to live, and the great care of our team at the San Francisco Bay-Delta wildlife center, this heron has thrived and now weighs more than 500 grams (see above).

More than 800 herons and egrets pass through our clinic doors each year, and the egrets have only just begun arriving! The average baby heron spends 40 days in care and runs up a $600 bill. Injured birds need more time and resources and will cost us more than $1,800. No public funds are provided to support these babies and we rely upon partners like YOU to help us pay their bills. They are a hungry bunch and your donation makes it possible to give them the best care.

Watch a video of a young Cattle Egret learning to feed.

Read more about how we team up with the Oakland Zoo and Golden Gate Audubon Society to save wild baby herons. You can also learn more about Black-crowned Night-Herons on the Audubon website.


 

Bird Rescue Is Hiring!

Ever dream of putting your fundraising or marketing skills to work for wildlife? Well, you’re in luck, Bird Rescue is hiring!

Come help become part of a development and communications team that will encourage others to support the important work we do everyday with seabirds and other aquatic birds.

Learn more

 

May 5, 2017

Celebrating Bird LA Day: Open House May 6th At Bird Rescue Los Angeles

We’ve got a great day lined up at International Bird Rescue as part of the annual Bird LA Day on May 6, 2017. This is  a rare chance for visitors to tour our Los Angeles Center and see our team in action as they rehabilitate sick and injured seabirds!. We will be starting the day with a bird walk through Fort MacArthur Museum and then join the clinic staff for a chance to learn more about our local aquatic species.

For 46 years, International Bird Rescue has been dedicated to mitigating the effects of human impact on seabirds and other aquatic species world wide. Not only is Bird Rescue a leader in oil spill response, but we also operate two California wildlife hospitals year round!

This is a terrific day to spend with the family and appreciate the beauty of the birds around us!

Bird Rescue schedule
8 am- Bird Walk at Fort MacArthur Museum (located next to Bird Rescue)
9 am- Visitor center and gift shop open
10 am, 12pm, 2pm- Bird Rescue Hospital tour
11 am- Visitor Welcome- Executive Director, JD Bergeron
1 pm- Blue Banded Pelican talk- Dr. Rebecca Duerr

Bird Rescue is located in San Pedro. The address is 3601 South Gaffey Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. See Map and Directions

Please note that tour space IS limited, so please get here early to sign up. Our visitor center and gift shop will be open all day with fun activities for the kids and knowledgeable volunteers to talk about what we do at Bird Rescue.

Please bring snacks, water, a hat, and sunscreen to help you enjoy the day! For more information about Bird Rescue, please visit our website at www.bird-rescue.org

 

May 1, 2017

Patients of the Week: Hooded Mergansers

Behold the four stooges! These adorable little troublemakers arrived at our San Francisco Bay wildlife center this week. They are diving ducks called Hooded Mergansers (affectionately known as “Hoodies”). As cavity nesters, the babies instinctually look upward and have already caused shenanigans at the center, having literally leaped up at the sheet covering their pen until they found a weak spot and escaped. We found them running around the floor of our baby unit after lunch this week!

These babies are also unusual in that they will not eat thawed fish, preferring food that is still moving. This means we have to buy minnows every few days from local pet stores to keep up with their appetites! Last time we raised ducklings like this, it cost us more than $3,200 just for fish! Please make a donation of $25 or more to support our Hooded Merganser food fund and we’ll send you a special link to a video of them exploring their enclosure and looking for an escape!! Please write “Hoodie” in the comments section so we know where to direct the funds.

Check them out on the BirdCam, too!

You can see what they will look like as adults, and learn lots more about this type of diving duck from our friends at Audubon: http://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/hooded-merganser.

Photo by Cheryl Reynolds