Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Archive for September 2016

September 19, 2016

We’ve Re-launched Our Membership Program and We Hope You’ll Come Aboard!

Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

You have helped us rehabilitate over 6,000 birds each year by supporting our work through donations to Bird Rescue. Thank you for your interest and gifts when you are able to make them — every gift is impactful, from the $5 one-time donation, to time spent by volunteers, to the thousand dollar gift or grant given. As we celebrate our 45 years of service together, we thought it was a great time to re-launch our membership program!

So what is the membership program, anyway, you might ask? It’s a one-time membership fee of $45 that gets you a year of member-only communications and a car decal to raise awareness for Bird Rescue.

Let’s get people talking about who we are as a Bird Rescue Family. From the person you park next to at the grocery store, your neighbor, your mom, daughter, son, dad, best friend — the people that you interact with everyday! We need ambassadors like you to bring life to the New Membership Program.

Our logo of the Pelican and Murre represent the connection to the fascinating world of aquatic birds, while the blue color identifies the hard work of our dedicated team of clinical staff. As their beaks almost touch, it shows that moment of connection between the birds and the people that care for them.

This brandmark is a symbol of the importance of wildlife rehabilitation for a healthy and vibrant community and ecosystem. It is a reminder to teach our youth about wildlife rehabilitation in the hopes that they will become our future conservationists.

Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

Placing this decal in a visible place is a simple, but effective way to remind people about the wondrous life of birds. Will you join the flock and help raise awareness of the importance of oceanic birds today?

BIG thank you to those that have already joined and please feel free to email Michele Johnson, our Membership Manager, at: michele.johnson@bird-rescue.org, if you have any questions about this NEW Membership Program. Thank you for your continued interest in the health of our aquatic avian species!

September 18, 2016

The Release Files: Pelican’s Slashed Pouch Ends On A Happy Note

pelican-n41-release

With her N41 blue band (inset photo), a healed Brown Pelican returns to the wild after being treated for a slashed pouch and leg injury. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck/International Bird Rescue

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Massive pouch laceration prior to surgical preparation. The bottom half of the pouch has been completely severed from the bird’s jaw. The white tube is delivering anesthetic gas to the bird’s trachea. Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Earlier this summer, our Los Angeles wildlife center received a female Brown Pelican from Ventura Harbor with injuries consistent with being slashed by a sharp object, very reminiscent of the injuries of Pink the Pelican, a case of ours from 2014. We reported the bird to US Fish and Wildlife Service as a likely animal cruelty case.

This new bird had a completely severed pouch, with straight cuts all the way back to behind her eyes on both sides (see image). She also had a razor-straight laceration on her right leg that cut deep into the muscle, but she was still able to stand and was in generally good condition. Like Pink, her pouch was stapled together temporarily so she could eat and regain her strength before surgery. It was repaired in one long surgical procedure instead of two as Pink’s was because the injury was, inches-wise, smaller than Pink’s– the bird was smaller overall, and the cut was angled through the pouch differently. The leg laceration was already infected when the bird arrived, but healed great with a combination of partial surgical closure and open wound management. The pouch repair healed fabulously in about two weeks.

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The severly slashed pouch was carefully sutured back together. Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Whenever one is keeping a wild animal in a cage there is a risk every day that the animal will hurt itself. When an animal nears readiness to be released it becomes more active and eager to get out, and the probability that it may hurt itself in its caging rises. This particular bird was very stressed in captivity, and was noticed to be limping one morning. At first we assumed her slashed leg was becoming infected again, but we quickly saw that the leg she was favoring was her formerly uninjured leg…uh oh! X-rays revealed that she had broken her femur near her hip joint while in the aviary. We don’t know how it happened or whether we could have done anything to prevent it, but this accident set the bird’s potential release date back substantially. She spent several weeks floating quietly in a private pool while her leg healed, which it did, and nicely, although when she first started walking again she had a very pronounced limp. Since then she has been becoming increasingly annoyed with us as we have waited for her limp to resolve sufficiently for her to be released. Currently, she is a super agile flier and stands and perches very normally, although she still has a mild limp when she walks; we expect this will fade with time as her fracture healed with excellent alignment.

We are extremely happy to announce that this beautiful girl who faced multiple serious threats to her life was finally released! With her shiny new blue plastic band N41, she returned to the wild on Saturday, September 17th at White Point in San Pedro. Please cheer her on if you see her out fishing off the coast. And also please report the sighting on our website so we can know she is out there doing well, back being a wild Brown Pelican.

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Pelican after slashed pouch was stitched back up.  Photo by Rebecca Duerr/International Bird Rescue

N41 Ready for Take-Off

N41 ready for take-off. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

September 2, 2016

Adopt-a-Loon in Honor of Loon Month!

Loon

This September we celebrate Loons as our bird of the month, and the unique care that is required for this particular species. Have you ever heard the sounds of a Loon? We’ve got a great video posted on our Facebook page, where you can watch and listen to the beautiful vocalizations. When a Loon comes through our doors, we must work quickly to stabilize, as loons tend to be one of the more fragile species we get into care.

Did you know it costs $10 a day to provide a Loon with fish to eat, the necessary medical treatment and supplements, and clean water to swim in?

This means for Loons alone, the average cost is $300 a month!

Will you help us by adopting a Loon today for just $10? For every Loon adopted we will share on our social media sites, to encourage participation and help meet our fundraising goal of $3,500. This will cover our estimated cost for caring for this species in the year ahead.

You can even adopt a bird as a gift to someone that you know works really hard as a thank you to him or her, while also helping a bird today. Your adoption includes a fun downloadable PDF that you can print and display proudly.

Will you help us reach our fundraising goal of $3,500 this month by adopting a Loon today?

Adopt-Loon