Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

Archive for June 2016

June 29, 2016

Preserving Wildlife in Images: A Community Event with Joel Sartore

Celebrate 45 years of wildlife preservation

Joel-Sartore-Penguin

Featured speaker: Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer.

When: Saturday, July 30, 2016 from 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM (PDT)

Where: International Bird Rescue – Los Angeles Wildlife Center

3601 South Gaffey St, San Pedro, CA 90731 :: Directions

• Guest Speaker: Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer and author
• Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue
• Follow an oiled bird’s journey from rescue to release
• Participate in a family-friendly interactive experience
• Learn how to contribute to wild-bird conservation
• Meet Bird Rescue’s wildlife response team
• Eat lunch at an onsite local food truck
• Enjoy an immersive and interactive art experience

Be sure to R.S.V.P on Eventbrite

Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue.

Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue.

Thank you for your continued interest in International Bird Rescue. We cannot do this work without you! Come join me and the Bird Rescue community for this special behind-the-scenes look at our LA Center and learn more about the ways we work together to mitigate human impact on aquatic aviary wildlife.

Also enjoy the stunning images and message from our special guest Joel Sartore, who photographed oiled wildlife during the Deepwater Horizon spill for National Geographic. This is a unique opportunity to celebrate the last 45 years and look ahead to our future in wildlife conservation and rehabilitation.

I hope to see you there!

JD Bergeron

Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

P.S. –Thanks to DAWN and the Los Angeles Port for their generous support!

POLA-Public-Invite-45th

June 3, 2016

The Release Files: Fare thee well, Great Blue!

An adult Great Blue Heron came to us from Native Animal Rescue in Santa Cruz after being found April 14 hanging from its right wing by fishing line. On arrival the bird had substantial skin damage and edema midway out the wingtip, and the bones felt possibly fractured under the swelling. We splinted and wrapped the wing for support to make the bird more comfortable, and scheduled x-rays for a few days later when the bird was more stable.

The x-ray showed the wingtip had not been fractured – but rather had ligament and bone damage at one of the two wingtip joints. Over the next week the edema resolved but the skin crossing the wing tip joint necrosed (died), leaving defects in skin coverage and an infected joint. Also the bird’s primary flight feathers were damaged and severely crimped which put them at high risk of breaking. With all the bird’s issues it was not looking good for this bird ever flying again.

In treatment we used a feather repair method where the feathers are soaked in extremely hot water to soften them. Then our staff veterinarian ‘ironed’ the feathers to reshape the crimped zones and thus restore the feather’s normal shape.

The skin and joint injuries were more complicated. Our vet treated the heron by surgically removing dead tissue and closing the main defect with adjacent skin. Another area of skin necrosis that exposed the infected joint itself was debrided, flushed, infused with an injectable antibiotic, and managed as an open wound.

The wingtip injuries finally and completely healed as of earlier this week, and we were at last confident the bird was out of the woods. So, with great pleasure, we released this gorgeous Great Blue Heron this week and watched it gracefully fly into the marsh!

 Photo by Cheryl Reynolds