Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

November 25, 2015

Patient of the Week: Heermann’s Gull

Heermanns-Gull-after-surgery

Photo Heermann's Gull hook removal at International Bird Rescue

A large fishing hook was removed from the stomach of a Heermann’s Gull (above) at International Bird Rescue. The gull is now in an outside aviary and is expected to fully recover. Photos by Cheryl Reynolds and Isabel Leuvano

A Heermann’s Gull is resting comfortably this week after our team removed a huge fishing hook that was lodged in the seabird’s stomach. It also had serious wounds at the corners of the mouth from the fishing line causing tissue damage.

Bird Rescue’s skillful veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, removed the hook at the San Francisco Bay Center. Post surgery, this bird has bounced back astonishingly well. The bird is already flying around our large aviary very enthusiastically, and the wounds are starting to heal.

The injured bird was found on November 8th in Santa Cruz and taken to Native Animal Rescue (NAR). It was transferred to Bird Rescue on November 14th.

A high number of seabirds enter our clinics each year with fishing tackle injuries. We encourage folks fishing to clean up after themselves. Hungry birds will eat fish scraps and embedded hooks are a big cause of injuries.

Heermann’s Gull (Larus heermanni) is a gray-bodied, white-headed gull that breeds in Mexico – mainly on Isla Rasa in the Gulf of California. It flies north along the Pacific Coast to southwest part of British Columbia. It’s a pretty aggressive gull and will chase other seabirds, especially Brown Pelicans, hoping to steal food.

These are your seabirds, too. Support their care: http://www.bird-rescue.org/donate

HEEG-15-3822-hook-2015-web

X-ray shows hook lodged in stomach area of a Heermann’s Gull.

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