Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

July 6, 2011

Yellowstone River Pipeline Spill – Media

 

Media Reports

Fewer Traces of Oil Found on Wildlife: KULR-8, August 31, 2011
International Bird Rescue still has crews walking along the riverbanks daily, but they aren’t finding as many cases of affected wildlife.

Exxon finishes cleaning first 4 sites in river spill: Billings Gazette, July 21, 2011
“Wildlife experts have cleaned and released the oiled Cooper’s hawk captured earlier this week.” “International Bird Rescue out of California was brought in by Exxon to clean wildlife affected by the spill. So far, workers have only had to treat three birds” “”We’re pretty happy that there’s not a lot of birds here,” said Jay Holcomb with International Bird Rescue.” “Crews cleaned a goose earlier in the week, which they’re still holding until it’s strong enough to release back into the wild.”

19 days after oil spill, officials still waiting on test results: KTVQ Billings, July, 20, 2011
“And good news to report about the Cooper’s Hawk that had been observed along the Yellowstone river with oil on it. Karen Nelson with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service said crews with the International Bird Rescue facility were able to capture the hawk on Tuesday. She says IBR workers reported the hawk was in good condition, were able to clean and wash it, and released the bird back into the wild.”

Bird rescue group pleased with limited impact of MT oil spill: KTVQ Billings, July, 20, 2011
“Following this week’s release of a list of the animals affected, and in some cases killed, by the oil spilled in the Yellowstone River, an opportunity was given to the media to visit the wildlife cleaning facility where the animals are being treated.”

Birds Recovering from Oil Spill: KULR-8, July 19, 2001
“The International Bird Rescue says they’ll stay as long as they’re needed.”

2 weeks out and scope of spill still unknown: Billings, Gazette, July 14, 2011
“Gary Hammond, director of the Billings region of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, said it’s important to attend to individual animals affected by the spill.” “But, he said, the main focus of the cleanup will be the overall ecology of the Yellowstone River and returning it to its pre-spill health.”

Wildlife assessment from Yellowstone River oil spill could be weeks: Great Falls Tribune, July 9,2011
“It may be two or three weeks before Montana officials can safely launch boats on the Yellowstone River to determine the extent of damage to wildlife from the July 1 oil spill, officials said.”

Search for oil-soiled wildlife continues along Yellowstone River: Billings Gazette, July 9, 2011
“Two boats are scheduled to go out onto shallow waters of the Yellowstone River on Saturday to search for wildlife that may have been affected by last week’s oil spill.”

Wildlife Along Yellowstone River Faring Well, So Far, but Landowners Struggle With Oil Spill: The New York Times, July 8, 2011
Jay Holcomb, director emeritus for the International Bird Rescue, which has partnered with Exxon on the cleanup effort, said the river’s rapid flow has made the area inhospitable to most waterfowl, sparing many that would normally be drawn to the river’s placid backwaters.” “We have sighted hundreds of clean and healthy Canada geese and mallard ducks, but no oiled birds,” he said in a blog entry yesterday. “All in all, this is not the worst spill we have been involved with. But it’s still a spill, and we will continue to monitor wildlife along the river as long as there is any risk.”

Yellowstone River Wildlife Rescue Continues: KULR-8, July 7, 2011
“We set up areas that we call quadrants, and we start looking as close as we can in each quadrant, and we do an assessment of where the oil is. We then start looking for wildlife and just get an idea of what’s in the area,” International Bird Search and Rescue Director Emeritus; Jay Holcomb said.

Rescuers Ask for Help Locating Affected Animals: KULR-TV, Updated July 6, 2011
“Six members of the nonprofit organization International Bird Rescue have been in town since Sunday. Rescuers are responsible for collecting and rehabilitating wildlife.” “Coordinator Mark Russell said the rescuers have years of experience, especially with waterfowl, and have worked on both the Gulf spill and the Exxon-Valdez spill.”

Crews search for wildlife harmed by oil: Billings Gazette, July 5, 2011
“As crews continue to sop up the oil and determine what caused the pipe to fail, others are trying to find those most vulnerable to the oil spill — waterfowl, fish and other aquatic species.”  “Six people from International Bird Rescue were walking the banks Tuesday.”

 

 

ExxonMobil News Releases

Yellowstone River Cleanup and Recovery Update: ExxonMobil, July 8, 2011
“We continue to work with International Bird Rescue, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to survey the area for impacts to wildlife. Members of the team are surveying the affected areas of the river for oiled wildlife. We are also inspecting the property of landowners who have called the claims and wildlife hotlines.” “On Thursday, International Bird Rescue collected a toad on a landowner’s property. The toad was cleaned on site and released, bringing the total number of treated wildlife to two. A garter snake was treated and released on Wednesday” “In addition, several lightly oiled birds were observed, none required capture or cleaning. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be performing aerial flights specifically looking for birds in impacted areas.” “Today, two boats are scheduled to go out onto the slack, or shallow, water to continue to search for any additional wildlife that may have been affected by the incident.”

Yellowstone River Cleanup and Recovery Update: ExxonMobil, July 7, 2011
“We have been working with International Bird Rescue and the Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks Departments to survey the area for impacts to wildlife. Members of the team have been deployed to inspect the property of landowners who have called the claims and wildlife hotlines.” “Yesterday, International Bird Rescue collected a garter snake on a landowner’s property. The snake was cleaned on site and released.”

Yellowstone River Cleanup and Recovery Continues: ExxonMobil, July 6, 2011
“We have been working with International Bird Rescue and the Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks Departments to survey the area for impacts to wildlife. Members of the team have been deployed to inspect the property of landowners who have called the claims and wildlife hotlines.” “To date, no wildlife have been collected.” “International Bird Rescue and the Humane Society are staged for immediate response and rehabilitation if needed.”

 

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