Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

September 27, 2014

Patient of the week: Virginia Rail

Bird-Rescue

Virginia Rail IMG_3288-L
Photo by Bill Steinkamp

This week, both our wildlife centers in California have cared for Virginia Rails, VIRAreclusive birds found in freshwater marshes.

This rail was found soaked and cold on Dockweiler Beach, not far from Los Angeles International Airport, by our friend and partner Peter Wallerstein of Marine Animal Rescue. Rehabilitation technician Kelly Berry reports that after a full examination, the clinic team determined that the bird had suffered an unknown trauma — the evidence of which was dried blood around the bird’s right ear and a small patch of feathers missing from its face.

This rail was tube-fed for a full day before it began self-feeding. Impressive weight gain followed, and after the bird’s blood values were back to normal, our team released this secretive patient back into suitable marsh habitat.

September 26, 2014

The week in bird news, Sept. 26

Bird-Rescue

primnm_expansion_actual_weez
Map courtesy Marine Conservation Institute

• When the world’s largest marine reserve quadruples in size, you know it’s been a good week in the conservation world.

On Thursday, President Obama expanded the total area of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument to 490,00 square miles — about three times the size of California.

While the overall size of the monument expansion is considerably less than what the administration originally proposed in July (782,000 square miles), it’s a victory protecting remote islands and surrounding open sea from commercial fishing. This can only mean good news for seabirds.

Via Vox:

5702927666_58b6d8d9e9_zThe area covered by the new reserve features a large number of fish, marine mammal, coral, bird, and plant species that aren’t found anywhere else in the world. There are several endangered species, such as the hawksbill sea turtle and the humphead wrasse. Additionally, the expansion increases the total number of protected underwater mountains called seamounts (known to be areas of high biodiversity) to 130, up from 50 in the old reserve.

While the reserve covers remote areas that don’t suffer heavily from local pollution or commercial fishing, there are some tuna fleets that operate in the area. They typically use purse seining techniques, which involve tightening a net around a school of fish attracted to something called a fish aggregating device. In many cases, this technique produces high amounts of bycatch — fish from other, unintended species that are discarded — so tuna fishing can deplete all sorts of fish species in an ecosystem. [Vox.com; photo: Masked Boobies, found on Jarvis Island and other remote islands protected by the marine reserve (photo via US Fish and Wildlife]

• Controversy builds over the incineration of migratory birds flying over a massive solar power plant in California. [WSJ]

• More research on marine pollution’s effects on seabirds show that plastic in the environment is highly absorbent of heavy metals such as lead, mercury and arsenic, which can impact fertility levels of birds as well as lead to malnutrition. [ABC-Australia]

• Dead seabirds are washing up at Pismo Beach along the central California coast, and authorities have yet to determine why. [KSBY-San Luis Obispo]

• Hungarian photographer Gyula Sopronyi gives a captivating bird’s eye view of barges as they traverse our oceans and rivers. [Huffington Post]

slide_368130_4216960_free

September 24, 2014

A sneak peek of Pelican Dreams in Sonoma

Bird-Rescue

Mark your calendars!

On Wednesday, October 8, our friends at Sonoma Birding are hosting a sneak-peek of Pelican Dreams, Judy Irving’s documentary on one of California’s most beloved birds. The film is a project six years in the making, with plenty of footage from our San Francisco Bay center. Our team will be in attendance to give you a wonderful picture of the work we do to help injured pelicans.

When: Wed, Oct 8 from 7pm -8:30pm
Where: Veteran’s Memorial Building, 126 First Street West, Sonoma CA
Tickets: $8 at the door

Via Sonoma Birding:

Pelican Dreams: Ready to Fly!!

Judy Irving, a Sundance- and Emmy-Award-winning filmmaker known for The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, is coming to Sonoma. Now it’s pelicans and their ancient magic, near-extinction and recovery paralleling our human relationship to the environment. One August afternoon, a confused, tired and very hungry young pelican landed on the roadway of the Golden Gate Bridge, causing a spectacular traffic jam and providing the beginning of a perfect narrative arc for this film.

Come see clips and hear from International Bird Rescue experts, who provided rehab care for “Gigi” (the pelican named for Golden Gate).

CA brown pelicans flying

September 24, 2014

A new aviary at our San Francisco Bay center

Bird-Rescue

13134580823_ea22ddc36b_z

Snowy Egret, photo by Cheryl Reynolds

Good news for the birds of California and beyond!

California state wildlife agencies have approved funding in the amount of $100,000 to create a new aviary for wild birds in Northern California harmed by oil spills and other environmental problems, officials announced Wednesday.

The 3,600-square-foot project will create a critically needed new aviary for egrets, herons, shorebirds and multiple species of waterfowl cared for year-round at the San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center, located in Fairfield and operated by our team at International Bird Rescue. Funding comes from the UC Davis Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center’s Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN) and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR).

Construction of the new $175,000-$200,000 structure is scheduled to begin in spring 2015.

The aviary will be built in memory of Jay Holcomb (pictured below), a pioneer in the field of oiled wildlife care who served for decades as International Bird Rescue’s executive director. Holcomb died on June 10 from kidney cancer at age 63.Logos-for-Release

“Jay Holcomb dedicated his life and career to helping birds in crisis, especially those injured due to human activities such as oil spills,” said Dr. Michael Ziccardi, Oiled Wildlife Care Network director. “I can think of no better way to honor his memory than helping to build a world-class aviary at one of the premiere OWCN facilities in California.”

In addition to the initial $100,000 contribution, Dr. Ziccardi said that his organization will also match private contributions for the project donated to the Jay Holcomb Legacy Fund, established by International Bird Rescue in July, up to an additional $100,000. Tax-deductible contributions can be made online at here.

jay holcombThe San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center is the primary facility to treat birds and other animals affected by oil spills in Northern California. The 12,000-square-foot center can accommodate up to 1,000 birds, and features outdoor aviaries and pools for a wide variety of seabirds and other aquatic species. Oiled animals from the 2007 Cosco Busan spill in the San Francisco Bay were transported and rehabilitated at the center, which routinely cares for nearly 3,000 birds annually.

“The Office of Spill Prevention and Response stands committed to ensuring the best achievable response to an oil spill, and this facility will provide injured wildlife with critical aid and rehabilitation,” said OSPR administrator Thomas Cullen. “California’s Oiled Wildlife Care Network is recognized throughout the world as a center of excellence in oiled wildlife care, and by helping to fund this project, we will maintain that excellence.”

Avocet IMG_2988-LBoth the International Fund for Animal Welfare and Dawn®, widely known for its use in cleaning oiled birds, have also committed generous funding to the new aviary. Dawn® is a longtime sponsor of International Bird Rescue, contributing both financially and through product donations.

The new aviary will comprise 14 separate enclosures designed specifically for the unique needs of aquatic birds in a wildlife rehabilitation setting. Species to be cared for include Black-crowned Night Herons, wading birds commonly found in local urban areas. This species was the subject of extensive national news coverage this summer after a rookery in Oakland was disturbed by tree trimmers, causing a number of baby birds to fall from their nests. Five surviving chicks were raised by International Bird Rescue and released in June.

The project was originally conceived by Holcomb, Ziccardi and staff of both International Bird Rescue and UC Davis in 2000 as a planned expansion of the San Francisco Bay center after its initial construction. The current design was developed in 2007 by architect Robert L. Shaw of Eugene, OR.

In July, local wildlife advocates and representatives of environmental groups from around the world paid tribute to Holcomb during a memorial event held at Fort Mason in San Francisco. Under his direction, International Bird Rescue grew into one of the world’s preeminent wildlife organizations, caring for animals affected by large-scale oil spills such as Exxon Valdez in 1989 and the Gulf Spill in 2010, where Holcomb and his team worked in four states to save pelicans, gannets and other birds harmed by the environmental disaster.

Black-crowned-Night-Heron-Karen-Schuenemann“An aviary that will care for thousands of injured birds each year is a moving and fitting tribute to Jay Holcomb,” said Barbara Callahan, International Bird Rescue interim executive director. “Jay’s dying wish was that his work continue full-steam. This funding will help us to accomplish that mission, and we’re so thankful for the support of all of our partners in protecting California’s precious wildlife.”

You can help support the construction of this new aviary, and your gift will be matched! Visit the Jay Holcomb Legacy Fund page for more info.

Bird photos: American Avocet (above) by Bill Steinkamp; Black-crowned Night Heron (below) by Karen Schueunemann.

September 16, 2014

Save the Date for the 2015 Effects of Oil on Wildlife Conference!

Bird-Rescue

EOW Save the Date
Save the date, fellow bird rescuers! Along with our partners at Aiuká, we’re hosting the next Effects of Oil on Wildlife Conference in Anchorage, Alaska on May 18-22, 2015.

Information on panelists, paper submissions and more will be found in the coming weeks at eowconference.org.

September 16, 2014

Renew your membership now and…

Barbara Callahan

Puffins-KennethColeSchneider

Dear friends,

Every fall, we humbly ask you to join or renew your membership with International Bird Rescue.

What we cannot say enough is, Thank you. A majority of our funding comes from people like you. And thanks to a longtime generous donor, when you join as a new member or renew your membership, your gift is DOUBLED.

IBR-breakdownIn 2014, we’ve seen it all: A pelican’s throat slashed by unknown assailants, a tiny aquatic patient among California’s most threatened, a colony of Black-crowned Night Herons disturbed by tree trimmers that resulted in our raising of many orphaned chicks … the list goes on and on. We even said goodbye to our beloved executive director, who left an indelible mark on the world of wildlife conservation and rehabilitation.

Will you help secure a solid future for this vital work? Your membership dollars support:

• The expert animal care for thousands of birds each year at our wildlife centers

• A global oil spill response team that ­has led emergency efforts on six continents

• Research and advocacy into seabird health and conservation that are critical to understanding global marine issues

And thanks to our partners, we have some wonderful perks for your membership. Click here to check them out! Join our Seabird Circle monthly giving program at $20 a month and you’ll receive all three gifts!

There’s never been a better time to become a member or to renew your membership.

Your support makes all the difference. And now you can double your impact through a matching gift from an anonymous donor. We need your support in order to secure this matching donation.

Every bird truly does matter. And so does every member.

Sincerely,

Barbara Signature

Barbara Callahan
Interim Executive Director

Puffin photo by Kenneth Cole Schneider/Flickr Creative Commons

September 12, 2014

Dispatches from the International Sea Duck Conference in Iceland

Curt Clumpner, Preparedness Director

8101342597_eb9d7f91f2_z
Harlequin Duck, photo by Andrew A Reding/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the past week, Reykjavik, Iceland has be the site of the 5th International Sea Duck Conference. More than 140 people from nearly 30 image_largecountries have listened, questioned and discussed a wide variety of issues important to understanding sea ducks, their biology, habitat, threats and survival. Unlike most conferences, we have also gotten daily volcano updates and had the opportunity to see eider ducks feeding at the shore. Iceland and Reykjavik are much as what you might expect, very modern surrounded by beautiful isolation.

The program has been both interesting and valuable for me and the work we do at International Bird Rescue. The papers have addressed effects of climate change, body condition measurement techniques, emerging diseases, developments in radio telemetry techniques, and sea duck monitoring and modeling. The primary species studied and discussed are the Long-tailed Duck, Common Scoter, Harlequin Ducks, and Common, King and Spectacled Eiders — all species that we have worked with in many responses going back to our founding in the 1970s. Nearly every presentation contains nuggets of information that can be applied to preparedness and response including rehabilitation. Being here provides an opportunity to find these nuggets as well as to network with the scientists who can be key in getting accurate information about local species at risk if a spill occurs.

While I have been surprised by how many of the participants I have met over the years, most of them are not regular participants in the Sea Duck Conference1-1rehabilitation or oil industry conferences we regularly attend. Their perspective is one that we less regularly hear, and that makes it even more valuable to hear their ideas. Responding to oil spills all over the world presents a number of different challenges, but one of the biggest problems is that we almost always lack local knowledge. We rely heavily on local people and local biologists working with the species affected by an oil spill to mount the best possible emergency response and to achieve the best possible care. Having a familiar face makes it that much easier to develop trust and understanding and get down to the emergency at hand.

One of the most interesting presentations for me was Dr. James Lovvorn’s talk on Designating Critical Habitat in a Climatically Changing Arctic: Eiders, Sea Ice and Food Webs, as one of my current projects is working on planning and preparedness on the remote Northwest Alaska coast of the Chukchi Sea. Although not as immediately of obvious value but very thought provoking were a number of papers on personalities, stress and brain size — all of which I hope to learn more about to further our rehabilitation success.

team_curt_cAll in all, it has been great experience, leaving me eager to apply what I have learned and also eager to learn more from some newly discovered colleagues.

Curt Clumpner

Preparedness Director

Map: Seabirds of Iceland via European Environment Agency

September 10, 2014

See you Sunday at the Wine Country Optics & Nature Festival!

Bird-Rescue

A must-see for birders, wildlife photographers and conservation-minded folks! Stop by our table and say hi while you’re there!

WineCountryOpticsFair2014

September 9, 2014

Climate disruptions affecting North America’s bird species

Bird-Rescue

comloo

Over half of North America’s bird species will see their geographic ranges dramatically shrink as a result of climate change in the coming decades, according to a new study by the National Audubon Society.

Based on decades of data from the Audubon Christmas Bird Count and the North American Breeding Bird Survey, the report finds that 126 avian species are “climate endangered,” meaning that they are projected to lose over 50% of their current habitat based on widely accepted greenhouse gas emissions projections. A loss of habitat and geographic shift in where birds can successfully feed and breed poses the risk of extinction for species that may not successfully adapt.

Among those predicted to lose habitat range include the Common Loon (see map above), the Bufflehead (photo right), and the California Gull — all Bucephala-albeola-007commonly seen at our wildlife centers in California.

“Common sense will tell you that with these kinds of findings, it’s hard to believe we won’t lose some species to extinction,” David Yarnold, president of the National Audubon Society, said in an interview with the New York Times. “How many? We honestly don’t know. We don’t know which ones are going to prove heroically resilient.”

Read the full article here.

 

September 3, 2014

Patient of the week: Brown Booby

Bird-Rescue

BRBO-1
Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck
BRBO
Brown Boobies are rare visitors to Southern California; this is only the second such patient we’ve received over the past year.

The juvenile Brown Booby you see above was found at Dockweiler Beach in Los Angeles and rescued by our friend Peter Wallerstein with Marine Animal Rescue. Upon intake our team found the bird to be emaciated and mildly dehydrated.

But after working with the bird all day, the team was able to get this booby self-feeding again. It’s since graduated to an outdoor aviary.

A year ago, International Bird Rescue’s Los Angeles center had another species of booby in care — a Blue-footed Booby, one of many that had mysteriously “invaded” SoCal. This patient was found injured on a south Los Angeles sidewalk and later released, as you can see in the video below.