Every Bird Matters
news and views from international bird rescue

December 7, 2016

An Unhappy Anniversary

Michele Johnson
Selendang-Ayu-Spill-Response 2004 in Alaska's Unalaska Island area on Berring Sea

Selendang-Ayu-Spill-Response 2004 in Alaska’s Unalaska Island area on Berring Sea

On the eve of the anniversary of the Selendang Ayu Spill (December 8, 2004), we are saddened to hear of the misfortune to the M/V Exito and her crew last night. Our hopes and prayers are with the captain and crew and their families.

The Exito and her crew were contracted with B​ird ​Rescue​’s Response Team during the M/V Selendang Ayu Oil Spill, a particularly challenging spill in the Aleutian Islands. selendang-ayu-spill-response-sc-sean-photos-117Because of the remoteness of the spill site, Bird Rescue contracted with the M/V Exito and the M/V Norseman, two crabbing vessels (think ​“Deadliest Catch”) that were available for when the fisheries around ​the island of ​Unalaska were closed because of the spill.

The Exito and her crew hosted several of our Response Team in addition to a specially-retrofitted Wildlife Stabilization unit, and was used to provide an at-sea “base camp” for our Responders and the wildlife they captured in extremely remote areas. Their contribution was invaluable to the wildlife we were able to help, and we hope that the missing crew are safely returned home.

You can read more here in an article from Alaska Dispatch.

November 24, 2016

Wishing You A Very Happy Thanksgiving!

Bird-Rescue


From this Leach’s Storm-Petrel and all of the staff and volunteers of Bird Rescue, we wishing you a very Happy Thanksgiving!

We are most thankful for your continuous support of our mission to mitigate human impact on aquatic birds for the last 45 years. This work would be impossible without you. Our hands, your help, makes all the difference in caring for birds like this tiny storm-petrel.

Although Leach’s Storm-Petrels usually fly at night, if you could see them, you’d recognize them by their distinctive zigzagging flight. They are colonial nesters that build their homes of dry grasses and stems and can be found burrowed in a field or among rocks. (Author, Stokes) Learn more about the Leach’s Storm-Petrel from our friends at Audubon by clicking here.

Want to help give a bird a second chance? Then mark your calendar for #GivingTuesday next week and remind your friends about us by forwarding this email! Thanks for your continued support!

Photo by Cheryl Reynolds

 

November 11, 2016

Shot In Face, American White Pelican Is Recovering

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After second surgery White Pelican is recovering from gunshot wound. Photo: Rebecca Duerr–International Bird Rescue

At International Bird Rescue we do not normally receive very many American White Pelicans, but in the past few months we have admitted three of them: one with two broken legs (see story), one currently in care at our Los Angeles center for minor injuries, and one that somebody shot in the face! Now admittedly, fall is hunting season and these guys live in wetlands where duck hunting happens, so it is possible this wasn’t malicious and the bird was hit by a stray bullet. Regardless, it is, of course, illegal to shoot pelicans.

x-ray of white pelican sinuses

X-ray shows bullet lodged in Pelican’s sinus cavity.

This gorgeous bird came to us after being found in Palo Alto at Matadero Creek at the Baylands. His first caregivers at Peninsula Humane Society noted the bird had blood in his mouth and inflated skin around his eyes with a scab under his left eye. Our vet thought from the initial pictures we were sent that it could be a gunshot wound. She was correct: the scab was an entry wound and the bullet was lodged on the opposite side of the roof of his mouth after passing through his cheek. The bullet was still lodged in his sinuses at the roof of his mouth (see x-ray, right).

Removing the bullet was easy but the passage of the object through the bird’s face caused abnormal air movement in his head. The inflated ‘cheek’ skin persisted and got worse until he was so visually impaired he was unable to look downward very well. White Pelicans need to be able to search below themselves in the water for dinner, and this guy was having trouble even navigating walking downhill very well. So, during a second surgery, our vet opened up both problematic cheeks and sutured closed any holes she could find that might be causing the air leakage and took a tuck in his facial skin lest he be left with, as the staff put it, “bags under his eyes”.

So far so good. His abnormal facial inflation has not returned and his wounds are healing. We have hopes he’ll be ready to release before too long!

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American White Pelican with abnormally inflated facial skin under his eyes after a gunshot injury to the face, shown prior to his second surgery. Photo: Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

Photo of American White Pelican resting while recovering from his second post-gunshot surgery

Recent photo of American White Pelican resting while recovering from his second post-gunshot surgery, kind of a “face lift”. Photo: Cheryl Reynolds-International Bird Rescue

 

October 31, 2016

Monsters Inside Us: Avian Eye Flukes

Rebecca Duerr
Photo of Microscope view of avian eye fluke

Microscope view of avian eye fluke. Photo by Lisa Robinson/International Bird Rescue

What could be creepier than the thought of having worms in your eye? This past year at International Bird Rescue we have seen quite a few cases of weird and horrifying eye worms in our patients. We don’t know if the increase is some side effect of California’s drought perhaps concentrating larger numbers of birds in smaller bodies of water, or some other factor. But in honor of Halloween we thought we’d share some knowledge about parasites of the eye. Knowledge is a good thing, right?

Philophthalmus gralli is a trematode (aka fluke) parasite that affects many species of birds. These worms look like miniature flatworms that have two suckers. The adult worms attach inside the bird’s eyelids in and around and on the conjunctiva and under the nictitans (3rd eyelid), where they suck blood and make lots of babies while irritating the heck out of the eye, of course. The fluke eggs hatch as they are released directly into water, where they find a snail they need for their next life stage. The ‘ripe’ larvae that leave the snail later encyst on aquatic vegetation, and wait for another bird to eat the plant. Once in the bird’s mouth they quickly burst free of their shell and make their way to their happy place in the eyelids of the bird to become an adult.

Yes, people can get this disease…but humans don’t get these dastardly worms directly from the birds! Instead, we can catch them from eating aquatic vegetation infested with worm cysts. We thankfully don’t have to worry too much about staff and volunteer exposure to these parasites since our pools lack a population of snails for the worms to complete their life cycle…but ewww!

Read more about their life cycle here: https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/philophthalmiasis/index.html

October 11, 2016

November 4th Open House at San Francisco Bay Wildlife Center

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white-pelican-open-house
Our 45th Anniversary Open House at our San Francisco Bay Wildlife Center is less than a month away! Tickets are only $5, which helps pay for the cost of the event. This includes exclusive behind the scenes tours, that aren’t otherwise open to the public.

Please RSVP today via Eventbrite

We hope to see you there!

September 19, 2016

We’ve Re-launched Our Membership Program and We Hope You’ll Come Aboard!

Michele Johnson
Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

You have helped us rehabilitate over 6,000 birds each year by supporting our work through donations to Bird Rescue. Thank you for your interest and gifts when you are able to make them — every gift is impactful, from the $5 one-time donation, to time spent by volunteers, to the thousand dollar gift or grant given. As we celebrate our 45 years of service together, we thought it was a great time to re-launch our membership program!

So what is the membership program, anyway, you might ask? It’s a one-time membership fee of $45 that gets you a year of member-only communications and a car decal to raise awareness for Bird Rescue.

Let’s get people talking about who we are as a Bird Rescue Family. From the person you park next to at the grocery store, your neighbor, your mom, daughter, son, dad, best friend — the people that you interact with everyday! We need ambassadors like you to bring life to the New Membership Program.

Our logo of the Pelican and Murre represent the connection to the fascinating world of aquatic birds, while the blue color identifies the hard work of our dedicated team of clinical staff. As their beaks almost touch, it shows that moment of connection between the birds and the people that care for them.

This brandmark is a symbol of the importance of wildlife rehabilitation for a healthy and vibrant community and ecosystem. It is a reminder to teach our youth about wildlife rehabilitation in the hopes that they will become our future conservationists.

Bird Rescue Membership Car Decal

Placing this decal in a visible place is a simple, but effective way to remind people about the wondrous life of birds. Will you join the flock and help raise awareness of the importance of oceanic birds today?

BIG thank you to those that have already joined and please feel free to email Michele Johnson, our Membership Manager, at: michele.johnson@bird-rescue.org, if you have any questions about this NEW Membership Program. Thank you for your continued interest in the health of our aquatic avian species!

September 18, 2016

The Release Files: Pelican’s Slashed Pouch Ends On A Happy Note

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With her N41 blue band (inset photo), a healed Brown Pelican returns to the wild after being treated for a slashed pouch and leg injury. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck/International Bird Rescue

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Massive pouch laceration prior to surgical preparation. The bottom half of the pouch has been completely severed from the bird’s jaw. The white tube is delivering anesthetic gas to the bird’s trachea. Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Earlier this summer, our Los Angeles wildlife center received a female Brown Pelican from Ventura Harbor with injuries consistent with being slashed by a sharp object, very reminiscent of the injuries of Pink the Pelican, a case of ours from 2014. We reported the bird to US Fish and Wildlife Service as a likely animal cruelty case.

This new bird had a completely severed pouch, with straight cuts all the way back to behind her eyes on both sides (see image). She also had a razor-straight laceration on her right leg that cut deep into the muscle, but she was still able to stand and was in generally good condition. Like Pink, her pouch was stapled together temporarily so she could eat and regain her strength before surgery. It was repaired in one long surgical procedure instead of two as Pink’s was because the injury was, inches-wise, smaller than Pink’s– the bird was smaller overall, and the cut was angled through the pouch differently. The leg laceration was already infected when the bird arrived, but healed great with a combination of partial surgical closure and open wound management. The pouch repair healed fabulously in about two weeks.

close-up-pelican-surgery

The severly slashed pouch was carefully sutured back together. Photo by Bill Steinkamp

Whenever one is keeping a wild animal in a cage there is a risk every day that the animal will hurt itself. When an animal nears readiness to be released it becomes more active and eager to get out, and the probability that it may hurt itself in its caging rises. This particular bird was very stressed in captivity, and was noticed to be limping one morning. At first we assumed her slashed leg was becoming infected again, but we quickly saw that the leg she was favoring was her formerly uninjured leg…uh oh! X-rays revealed that she had broken her femur near her hip joint while in the aviary. We don’t know how it happened or whether we could have done anything to prevent it, but this accident set the bird’s potential release date back substantially. She spent several weeks floating quietly in a private pool while her leg healed, which it did, and nicely, although when she first started walking again she had a very pronounced limp. Since then she has been becoming increasingly annoyed with us as we have waited for her limp to resolve sufficiently for her to be released. Currently, she is a super agile flier and stands and perches very normally, although she still has a mild limp when she walks; we expect this will fade with time as her fracture healed with excellent alignment.

We are extremely happy to announce that this beautiful girl who faced multiple serious threats to her life was finally released! With her shiny new blue plastic band N41, she returned to the wild on Saturday, September 17th at White Point in San Pedro. Please cheer her on if you see her out fishing off the coast. And also please report the sighting on our website so we can know she is out there doing well, back being a wild Brown Pelican.

brown-pelican-pouch-post-surgery

Pelican after slashed pouch was stitched back up.  Photo by Rebecca Duerr/International Bird Rescue

N41 Ready for Take-Off

N41 ready for take-off. Photo by Kylie Clatterbuck

September 2, 2016

Adopt-a-Loon in Honor of Loon Month!

Bird-Rescue

Loon

This September we celebrate Loons as our bird of the month, and the unique care that is required for this particular species. Have you ever heard the sounds of a Loon? We’ve got a great video posted on our Facebook page, where you can watch and listen to the beautiful vocalizations. When a Loon comes through our doors, we must work quickly to stabilize, as loons tend to be one of the more fragile species we get into care.

Did you know it costs $10 a day to provide a Loon with fish to eat, the necessary medical treatment and supplements, and clean water to swim in?

This means for Loons alone, the average cost is $300 a month!

Will you help us by adopting a Loon today for just $10? For every Loon adopted we will share on our social media sites, to encourage participation and help meet our fundraising goal of $3,500. This will cover our estimated cost for caring for this species in the year ahead.

You can even adopt a bird as a gift to someone that you know works really hard as a thank you to him or her, while also helping a bird today. Your adoption includes a fun downloadable PDF that you can print and display proudly.

Will you help us reach our fundraising goal of $3,500 this month by adopting a Loon today?

Adopt-Loon

August 26, 2016

American White Pelican Out of Trouble

Michele Johnson
American White Pelican

American White Pelican released at McNabney Marsh, Martinez. This bird came to us with two broken legs, but has since recovered from surgery, ready for the wild! Photo: Cheryl Reynolds

Great news! The American White Pelican reported in our July 26 blog post successfully recovered from his two leg fractures and was released Aug 22 in McNabney Marsh in Martinez, CA.

When the cage was opened, he calmly walked out and took his time walking over to the water. We watched an interesting display of pelican thought processes as he decided what to do next. He first looked at a large group of his species resting on the shore far away, and then a smaller group closer to us that were in the water feeding. He took one last look back at us then entered the water and swam a small distance, next thing we knew he was taking flight towards the small feeding group. After landing in the water he calmly swam up to them and immediately started enjoying his first self-caught meal in more than a month. We could not have asked for a more perfect release of this bird back into the wild!

American White Pelican

American White Pelican “Double Trouble” taking flight to join a small group of his species. Photo: Cheryl Reynolds

Note from Dr Rebecca Duerr:

The highlight of August for me was this release! The care of this single bird really exemplified the nature of everything we do for thousands of birds every year, requiring a tremendous and coordinated effort among all the bird’s caregivers in order for him to make it to release. Every aspect of his care from housing and feeding decisions and delivery, to anesthesia, surgery, and medication administration, to assuring nothing bad happened during his time in private pools or the pelican aviary, to the funding that paid for it all, was absolutely essential for getting this guy out the door.

Having worked in wildlife rehabilitation for nearly 30 years, I have a really solid appreciation that pretty much everything I am able to do surgically for our birds is dependent on the efforts of everyone else; the fanciest surgery is totally pointless without the rest. Consequently, I’d like to personally say thank you to everyone who had a hand in this guy’s and every other bird’s care! Great teamwork all around! Thank you for being willing to go the extra mile for our patients.

You can read more about his care here: http://blog.bird-rescue.org/index.php/2016/07/patient-of-the-week-double-trouble-american-white-pelican/

How did you help a bird today?

American White Pelican standing on exam table during a check-up. Both external fixators are visible; they are made of steel pins that pass through the bone and a combination of metal and epoxy that holds the external portions of the pins in the correct position. The odd shapes are due to the shapes of pelican legs, each fracture's different need for support, and the need for the bird to be able to both stand and crouch comfortably.

In July the American White Pelican had external fixators attached made of steel pins that pass through the bone and a combination of metal and epoxy that holds the external portions of the pins in the correct position.

August 5, 2016

Our 45th Anniversary Celebration Was A Huge Success Thanks To You!

Bird-Rescue
Community_KPlummer

We had a great turnout at our 45th celebration in San Pedro. Photo: Katrina Plummer

Last Saturday, July 30th, at our San Pedro wildlife rehabilitation center, we joined the community in celebrating 45 years of service to aquatic bird species. Dawn and the Port of Los Angeles (POLA) joined forces as our main sponsors and helped us put together a phenomenal event.

We were beyond thrilled to have Joel Sartore as our keynote speaker at the event. Joel specializes in documenting endangered species and landscapes around the world. He is the founder of the Photo Ark project, a 25-year photographic documentary to save species and habitat. In his words, “it is folly to think that we can destroy one species and ecosystem after another and not affect humanity. When we save species, we’re actually saving ourselves.” He certainly inspired our group to continue this quest to respond to, rehabilitate and ultimately protect our wildlife for future generations.

This family-friendly event also featured exclusive behind-the-scenes tours of our wildlife center, educational tables, immersive art with Greenly Art Space, delicious food trucks, and more! We hosted a raffle, with items such as a special weekend at our partners Terranea’s Resort, in which we regularly release birds from their beach-front property.

The highlight of the day was our extraordinary release of a very special pelican that was given, not only a second, but a third chance at life. Dawn hosted a Facebook Live stream of the release that you can watch here: https://www.facebook.com/dawn/videos/10153670480956820/. Pelican N39 came to us at our SF Bay Center back in 2010 emaciated and anemic, and was released after a typical three weeks stay. He had been spotted all over California, up and down the coast and as far north as Washington State. With the help from Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, he came back through our doors at our San Pedro Center with an abdominal puncture wound and toe injury. He stayed a bit longer this time, for five months, until he was ready to be released. The timing couldn’t have been more perfect to pay homage to this landmark occasion. N39 did not hesitate in his flight as he soared out into the open ocean, and back to the wild.

This event beautifully demonstrated how our community can come together to give voice to the wild birds and stand behind their needs. We so are excited that you were able to celebrate with us as we launch into the next phase of Bird Rescue.

Missed it? There’s still time to celebrate! We will be hosting a 45th Anniversary Gala next spring in the San Francisco Bay Area and hope you’ll be able to join us. Stay tuned and thank you again for all that you do for International Bird Rescue!

Many thanks to all of our hard working volunteers, staff, and generous sponsors: POLA, Dawn, McRoberts Sales, Tesoro, OWCN, Princess Cruises, Dr. John and Mrs. Terry Miller, and anonymous donations from long-time supporters. We couldn’t do this without you!

How Will You Help A Bird Today?

Joel Sartore

Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer and founder Of Photo Ark, joined us for an inspirational talk about preserving wildlife through images. Photo: Bill Steinkamp

July 28, 2016

Patient of the Week: Double Trouble American White Pelican

Bird-Rescue
Photo of American White Pelican with two fractured legs i care at International Bird Rescue

American White Pelican with two fractured legs contemplating fish while in a recovery cage we call a “peli box”. (Photos by Rebecca Duerr – International Bird Rescue)

American White Pelican standing on exam table during a check-up. Both external fixators are visible; they are made of steel pins that pass through the bone and a combination of metal and epoxy that holds the external portions of the pins in the correct position. The odd shapes are due to the shapes of pelican legs, each fracture's different need for support, and the need for the bird to be able to both stand and crouch comfortably.

American White Pelican standing on exam table during a check-up. Both external fixators are visible; they are made of steel pins that pass through the bone and a combination of metal and epoxy that holds the external portions of the pins in the correct position.

This beautiful American White Pelican was transferred to us on July 18 from our colleagues at the SPCA for Monterey County’s Wildlife Center, after being found on a rural road in Monterey County with injuries consistent with being stuck by a vehicle. They sent our staff veterinarian, Dr. Rebecca Duerr, some x-rays that did not make the case seem very hopeful…but it was intriguing! The bird had a good attitude (snappy and feisty) and was in otherwise good condition, but had two broken legs. In pelicans, the bone that is broken in this bird (the tarsometatarsus) is a fracture that requires pinning in order to have a good outcome. Our vet had pinned several of these in pelicans before but never both legs on the same bird! The rehabilitators in Monterey splinted the fractures temporarily and transferred him to our San Francisco Bay center for surgery.

On examination at our center, the left tarsometatarsus had intact skin but felt like a crunchy shattered mess through the whole middle half of the bone. On the x-rays we could see a series of longitudinal cracks, but it felt structurally sound on each end, which boded well for holding pins. The right side felt more-or-less intact but had a squishy, caved-in area on the front side that appeared as a greenstick (incomplete) fracture on x-rays. Even in a well-fitted splint, greenstick tarsometatarsus fractures in pelicans tend to bend and warp as they heal, leaving the bird with altered weight-bearing on the leg and subsequent trouble standing and walking. Both legs definitely needed pinning. Surgery to place pins happened last week.

We are happy to report this bird is now standing and walking very well on his pinned legs! He is also much less cranky now that he can stand up and walk away from us. He has been spending his time enjoying the menu and has gained quite a bit of weight. His foot posture when standing is excellent and he has perfect control of all his toes. So far so good!

The pins will be removed in a few weeks.

How did you help a bird today? Donate and support the ongoing care that our two California wildlife centers provide to to 5,000+ aquatic birds each year.

X-rays of American White Pelican with broken legs in care at International Bird Rescue

Radiographs of the left (on left) and right (on right) tarsometatarsus (leg) fractures in an American White Pelican. The right leg has a a greenstick (incomplete) fracture, and the metal piece of bird shot does not appear associated with the fracture. The left leg shows multiple longitudinal fractures throughout the central half of the bone.

Closeup of American White Pelican sleeping peacefully under anesthesia while his two fractured legs are being pinned.

Closeup of American White Pelican sleeping peacefully under anesthesia while his two fractured legs are being pinned.

July 17, 2016

Freshly Hatched Cormorants: ‘They’re Getting So Big!’

Bird-Rescue

DCCO-chicks-yawnCormorant eggs found by Caltrans last month are beginning to hatch, representing a rare example of how humankind can come together to save wildlife. Staff and volunteers at International Bird Rescue are buzzing about happily, sharing images of the new hatchlings. Here, you get to see one of those precious pictures.

Help-Cormie-HatchlingAt just three days old, they are growing fast! It takes the keen attention of dedicated staff to make sure they get the best chance at survival by feeding them on the hour while wearing a head-to-toe bird suit, as to protect them from being too comfy with humans.

Isabel Luevano, our Lead Rehab Technician in our San Francisco Bay Center states, “Just three days ago, they were so tiny only eating small bits of fish. Now these guys are ready for whole fish. They’re getting so big!”

Double-crested cormorants are a robust seagoing bird with some amazing abilities. They are great flyers, superb divers, and are one of the few species of aquatic birds whose feathers are not completely waterproof. They spend hours sunning themselves and waving their wings to dry off after a swim. In nature, you can see them easily on rocks along many shorelines.

Won’t you help these little guys today, by making a $15 dollar donation to help pay for the cost of food? We want to see these Cormies continue to grow healthy and strong and reach adulthood in the wild. How beautiful would it be to see one of them out on the rocks sunning themselves under the big open sky?!

Our clinics operate with the help of individual giving, so any amount you offer has a huge impact. We even have simple monthly giving programs, for as little as $4 per month that make you an official member. For questions related to membership or other ways to give, please contact Michele Johnson at michele.johnson@bird-rescue.org.

Caltrans and International Bird Rescue continue to work closely to monitor the old Bay Bridge site for cormorants and any nesting behavior. This public-private partnership and others like it are crucial for wildlife conservation. Thank you for your continued interest and support of International Bird Rescue’s mission to mitigate human impact on seabirds and other aquatic bird species.

Photo Credit: Cheryl Reynolds

July 15, 2016

Meet Talia: A Bird Rescue Intern Making A Difference

Jake Skoglund

Talia-Science-FairWe are pleased to honor Talia Baddour, above, a recent intern at International Bird Rescue (Bird Rescue) in San Pedro, CA, who was the recipient of the first place award in the Zoology category at Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District Science and Engineering Fair. She was also awarded the United States Air Force Award at a science fair held at the South Bay Botanical Gardens.

HCBF_Logo with webTalia came to Bird Rescue through the Harbor Community Academic Internship program. This program is funded by the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation which gives local students the chance to gain experience in wildlife conservation and biology. The program also gives Bird Rescue the opportunity to connect with local students in the community. Due to the nature of the work performed at Bird Rescue, community interaction is limited. The program allows Bird Rescue to expand this interaction by granting students with an interest in animals, wildlife conservation, or biology access to see how the field operates outside the academic world.

Talia was accepted into the Harbor Community Academic Internship program in the summer of 2015. During her time at Bird Rescue, she witnessed the human impact on the local sea bird population, watched people who have dedicated their careers to mitigating this impact, and observed the importance of a positive and welcoming work environment. In her words she said “actually seeing first-hand what birds go through and how they are affected by people has helped me understand the importance of protecting them.” The internship allowed her to experience the amount of work that goes into helping injured birds and eventually returning them to the wild. She further stated the people she interacted with at Bird Rescue were “the most social coworkers I have ever had,” and they played a major role in helping her complete the research project.

The program requires the intern to work on a research project focused on a subject related to the work done at Bird Rescue. With the help of the Bird Rescue staff the intern chooses a project in an area that is of most interest to them. Talia studied a phenomenon known as Broken Feather Patch (BFP), which affects aquatic bird species such as loons and Common Murres. A bird that is found to have a BFP typically cannot maintain its plumage in a waterproof state. The BFP structurally compromises the bird’s feather layers leaving their skin to be exposed to cold ocean water, leading to hypothermia. In her research, Talia found that Common Murres are more likely to have a BFP than any other species. She also found that most birds (59%) coming in with BFPs were from Malibu beaches. This led her to theorize that because Malibu has so many miles of beach property and a high number of people visiting these beaches that the stranded or beached bird was more likely to be recovered in these areas. Finally, she noted that although BFPs were more common in non-oiled birds, they were the primary reason for euthanasia in oiled ones.

talia-bird-rescue-intern

Talia with other interns who helped at Dawn dish soap event featuring Ian Somerhalder, right, as the guest celebrity.

Interns have the opportunity to participate in events held by Bird Rescue. Talia helped with an event sponsored by Dawn dish soap featuring Ian Somerhalder as the guest celebrity. This event was held to raise awareness of human impact on the environment and highlighted the partnership Dawn has with Bird Rescue. The event was held at the Bird Rescue San Pedro facility and allowed the staff and volunteers to take part in educating the public. Events such as these occur frequently at Bird Rescue in an effort to educate the public about the work that takes place in this unique environment. The interns are welcomed to help and participate in many aspects.

Another benefit of the internship program is the opportunity to participate during environmental crises, such as oil spills. Interns gain first-hand knowledge and hands-on experience by aiding the staff in these events. They work in a fast-paced work environment alongside the staff and learn how bird care is performed when high volumes of effected birds are rehabilitated simultaneously.

In March 2016, Talia entered her research study in the Palos Verdes Peninsula United School District (PVPUSD) Science and Engineering fair. This event is held by The Palos Verdes Peninsula Education Foundation (www.pvpef.org). This foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing key programs and staff to the local schools. Talia was awarded first place against 18 student entries in the category of Zoology. She also won the United States Air Force Award, in a field of 115 entrants at a science fair held at the South Bay Botanical Gardens. After winning these two awards, Talia decided to continue working with Bird Rescue by volunteering in the hospital and working with the birds directly.

This internship program has proven to be highly beneficial. Interns receive the unique opportunity to interact, research, and observe the amazing work performed at International Bird Rescue. Those that have graduated the program have walked away with invaluable skills that they can apply in their future career choices.

July 6, 2016

Window into the Pelican’s World: New Streaming PeliCam At Los Angeles Center

Russ Curtis

Photo of Brown Pelican from the new PeliCam at Bird Rescue's Los Angeles Center

We’re excited to announce we’ve added a new live streaming BirdCam to our Los Angeles Center!

Thanks to a grant from the Christen C. and Ben H. Garrett Family Foundation we recently installed a new high definition video system that really shows off our bird patients recuperating in the 100-foot flight aviary. Viewers will see Brown Pelicans, Cormorants, Gulls and more. Another camera indoors will show off ducklings , goslings and other species.

This is the first live streaming set of cameras at our Los Angeles Center located near the coast in San Pedro. Bird Rescue’s first BirdCam feed began three years ago at our San Francisco Bay Center.

With two full-time wildlife centers in California, we treat more than 6,000 bird patients a year. All of our support comes from  individual donations, foundation grants and corporate donations.

With the addition of the new BirdCam in Southern California, we are moving to a new streaming platform via HDonTap. This new feed works on all devices including the iPhone and iPad without the need for a Flash player.

We’d like to thank HDonTap and especially Joe Pifer who designed and install the new system.

We also want to give a big shout out of thanks to Doug Lankenau and Dave Goleman, volunteers at the California Fish and Wildlife volunteer program. Additionally, they provided us with wiring assistance at the San Francisco Bay Center by designing and fabricating two special mobile camera mounts for our inside caging.

The Axis Q1765-LE, an HD camera, is used to capture live video feed from the pelican aviary in San Pedro, CA.

Equipment used

Back in 2013 with a very modest budget Bird Rescue purchased two Axis 1214-E cameras. These are very small security keyhole cameras got us off the ground but they were really not built to withstand the punishing outdoor weather and indoor moisture issues at our centers.

This year we moved to high definition (HD) cameras. We again chose Axis cameras, but opted for more sturdy, weather resistant models. The outdoor pool cameras are Axis Q765-LE models with optical zooms. They are sharp durable models with heavy weatherproofing, IR and audio capable. The indoor duckling and ICU boxes are running on Axis 3364-LVE models for a wide view. They too have IR and audio abilities.

The system is managed by Russ Curtis, Bird Rescue’s Technology Manager.

http://www.axis.com/us/en/products/axis-p1214-e

http://www.axis.com/us/en/products/axis-q1765-le

http://www.axis.com/us/en/products/axis-p3364-lve

June 29, 2016

Preserving Wildlife in Images: A Community Event with Joel Sartore

Bird-Rescue

Celebrate 45 years of wildlife preservation

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Featured speaker: Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer.

When: Saturday, July 30, 2016 from 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM (PDT)

Where: International Bird Rescue – Los Angeles Wildlife Center

3601 South Gaffey St, San Pedro, CA 90731 :: Directions

• Guest Speaker: Joel Sartore, National Geographic photographer and author
• Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue
• Follow an oiled bird’s journey from rescue to release
• Participate in a family-friendly interactive experience
• Learn how to contribute to wild-bird conservation
• Meet Bird Rescue’s wildlife response team
• Eat lunch at an onsite local food truck
• Enjoy an immersive and interactive art experience

Be sure to R.S.V.P on Eventbrite

Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue.

Explore the behind-the-scenes world of Bird Rescue.

Thank you for your continued interest in International Bird Rescue. We cannot do this work without you! Come join me and the Bird Rescue community for this special behind-the-scenes look at our LA Center and learn more about the ways we work together to mitigate human impact on aquatic aviary wildlife.

Also enjoy the stunning images and message from our special guest Joel Sartore, who photographed oiled wildlife during the Deepwater Horizon spill for National Geographic. This is a unique opportunity to celebrate the last 45 years and look ahead to our future in wildlife conservation and rehabilitation.

I hope to see you there!

JD Bergeron

Executive Director
International Bird Rescue

P.S. –Thanks to DAWN and the Los Angeles Port for their generous support!

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